transgender
Pronunciation
  • (GA) IPA: /tɹænzˈdʒɛndɚ/
  • (RP) IPA: /tɹanzˈdʒɛndə/
Adjective

transgender (not comparable)

  1. (narrowly) Having a gender (identity) which is different from the sex one was assigned at birth: being assigned male at birth but having a female or non-binary gender or vice versa; or, pertaining to such people. (Compare transsexual, and the following sense.)
    • 2010, Jessica Green, "I'm sorry, I'm not lesbian", The Guardian, 3 Mar 2010:
      One head of a small gay charity visibly flinched when I mentioned my boyfriend and has been cold towards me ever since. I've even caught someone staring down my top to see if I'm transgender.
    • 2010, Natasha Lennard, "City Room", New York Times, 7 Apr 2010:
      But the inclusion of the word “trannie” — a pejorative, in some circles — in the title, and the film’s parodic representation of transgender women, has offended many people.
  2. (broadly) Not identifying with culturally conventional gender roles and categories of male or female; having changed gender identity from male to female or female to male, or identifying with elements of both, or having some other gender identity; or, pertaining to such people. (Compare genderqueer, transsexual.)
    • 1998, John Cloud, "Trans across America", Time, 20 Feb 1998:
      Their first step was to reclaim the power to name themselves: transgender is now the term most widely used, and it encompasses everyone from cross-dressers (those who dress in clothes of the opposite sex) to transsexuals (those who surgically "correct" their genitals to match their "real" gender).
  3. (of a space) Intended primarily for transgender people.
    • 2001, Walter O. Bockting, Sheila Kirk, Transgender and HIV: Risks, Prevention, and Care, page 46:
      In Boston, no AIDS prevention messages are posted at the primary drag queen and transgender bar.
  4. (of a space) Available for use by transgender people (in addition to non-transgender people).
    • 2002 October 2, Boston Globe, Group wants transgender bathrooms for UMASS, quoted in 2010, Sheila L. Cavanagh, Queering Bathrooms ISBN 1442699973
    • 2010, Harvey Molotch, Laura Noren, Toilet: Public Restrooms and the Politics of Sharing, page 199:
      Why the sudden outcry for transgender bathrooms?
    • 2013, William Keith, Christian O. Lundberg, Public Speaking: Choice and Responsibility:
      In contrast, in a democratic conversation or dialogue, the speaker would begin by identifying the larger public issues that connect to the availability of transgender bathrooms: equality, civil rights, […]
Synonyms Antonyms Translations Noun

transgender (uncountable)

  1. (countable, now, often, offensive) A transgender person.
    • 2005, Walter Bockting & Eric Avery, Transgender Health and HIV Prevention, page 116:
      In a patriarchal society in which machismo rules, MTF transgenders represent a challenge to traditional masculinity due to their renouncing of the male position of social power.
    • 2015, Helen Davies, Transgender woman forced to move house after death threats and knife in her front door (in The Liverpool Echo)
      Nat spent years being victimised as a male to female transgender but was too scared to report it.
  2. (uncountable, rare) Transgenderism; the state of being transgender. (Compare transsex.)
    • 2007, Alison Stone, An Introduction to Feminist Philosophy ISBN 074563883X, page 41
      Before we can answer this question, we need to consider two other phenomena – transsex and transgender – which also expose the muddle within conventional categories of sex.
Translations Verb

transgender (transgenders, present participle transgendering; past and past participle transgendered)

  1. (uncommon) To change the gender of; (used loosely) to change the sex of. (Compare transsex.)
    • 2005, Sue Tolleson-Rinehart, Jyl J. Josephson, Gender and American Politics ISBN 0765631563, pages 15 and 205:
      […] and one that is still dominated by male nominees, women nominees might be seen as either contributing to the regendering, or the transgendering, of the Cabinet.
      This chapter examines women secretaries-designate in terms of their contributions to regendering or transgendering a cabinet office, to a gender desegregation or integration of the cabinet.
Related terms


This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.004
Offline English dictionary