turn on
Verb

turn on

  1. (transitive) To set a flow of fluid or gas running by rotating a tap or valve. [from 19th c.]
    Turn on the tap
  2. (transitive) To power up, to put into operation, to start, to activate (an appliance, light, mechanism, functionality etc.).
    Please turn the lights on so I can see what I'm reading.
    Please turn on automatic updates.
  3. (intransitive, of a device) To start operating; to power up, to become on. [from 19th c.]
    My computer won't turn on.
  4. (transitive) To fill with enthusiasm; to intoxicate, give pleasure to ( + to an object of interest or excitement). [from 20th c.]
    Attractive packaging can turn buyers on to a product.
    Attractive showroom models can turn buyers on
  5. (transitive) To sexually arouse. [from 20th c.]
  6. (transitive, slang) To cause to take up drugs, especially hallucinogens.
    • 1976, Robert H. Coombs, Lincoln J. Fry, Patricia G. Lewis, Socialization in drug abuse
      In fact, many youngsters will not even turn on a close friend if they know he has never used drugs. And it is rare indeed for a youth to actively seek out people to turn on.
  7. (intransitive) To violently rebel against; to suddenly attack this is the intransitive verb turn, with on functioning as a preposition not as an adverbial particle. [from 19th c.]
    Suddenly all his friends turned on him.
  8. (intransitive) To depend upon; to pivot around, to have as a central subject this is the intransitive verb turn, with on functioning as a preposition not as an adverbial particle. [from 17th c.]
    The argument turned on the question of whether or not jobs would be lost.
Related terms Antonyms Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • Italian: rivoltarsi contro
Translations


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