vent
Pronunciation Noun

vent (plural vents)

  1. An opening through which gases, especially air, can pass.
    the vent of a cask; the vent of a mould
  2. A small aperture.
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Troylus and Cressida”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene iii]:
      Look, how thy wounds do bleed at many vents.
    • 1715, Alexander Pope, The Temple of Fame:
      Long 'twas doubtful, both so closely pent, / Which first should issue thro' the narrow vent.
  3. The opening of a volcano from which lava flows.
  4. A verbalized frustration.
  5. The excretory opening of lower orders of vertebrates.
  6. A slit in the seam of a garment.
  7. The opening at the breech of a firearm, through which fire is communicated to the powder of the charge; touchhole.
  8. In steam boilers, a sectional area of the passage for gases divided by the length of the same passage in feet.
  9. Opportunity of escape or passage from confinement or privacy; outlet.
  10. Emission; escape; passage to notice or expression; publication; utterance.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 10”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      without the vent of words
    • c. 1604–1605, William Shakespeare, “All’s VVell, that Ends VVell”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene iii]:
      Thou didst make tolerable vent of thy travel.
Related terms Translations Translations Translations
  • Italian: sfogo
  • Russian: излива́ние
Translations
  • French: cloaque
  • Italian: ano
  • Russian: ана́льное отве́рстие
  • Spanish: cloaca, ano
Verb

vent (vents, present participle venting; past and past participle vented)

  1. (intransitive) To allow gases to escape.
    The stove vents to the outside.
  2. (transitive) To allow to escape through a vent.
    Exhaust is vented to the outside.
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To express a strong emotion.
    He vents his anger violently.
    Can we talk? I need to vent.
    • 2013 June 18, Simon Romero, "Protests Widen as Brazilians Chide Leaders ↗," New York Times (retrieved 21 June 2013):
      But the demonstrators remained defiant, pouring into the streets by the thousands and venting their anger over political corruption, the high cost of living and huge public spending for the World Cup and the Olympics.
  4. To snuff; to breathe or puff out; to snort.
Translations Translations Translations Noun

vent (plural vents)

  1. Ventriloquism.
Noun

vent

  1. sale; opportunity to sell; market
    • There is no vent for any commodity but of wool.
Verb

vent (vents, present participle venting; past and past participle vented)

  1. To sell; to vend.
    • Therefore did those nations vent such spice.
Noun

vent (plural vents)

  1. (obsolete) A baiting place; an inn.
Noun

vent (plural vents)

  1. (medicine, colloquial) ventilation or ventilator.
    I have adjusted the vent settings.
Verb

vent (vents, present participle venting; past and past participle vented)

  1. (medicine, colloquial) To ventilate; to use a ventilator; to use ventilation.



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