yield
Pronunciation Verb

yield (yields, present participle yielding; past yielded, past participle yielded)

  1. (obsolete) To pay, give in payment; repay, recompense; reward; requite.
    • c. 1598–1600, William Shakespeare, “As You Like It”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene iv]:
      God 'ild [yield] you, sir!
    • c. 1606–1607, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene ii]:
      Tend me to-night two hours, I ask no more, / And the gods yield you for 't.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Francis Beaumont; John Fletcher, “The Spanish Curate”, in Comedies and Tragedies […], London: Printed for Humphrey Robinson, […], and for Humphrey Moseley […], published 1647, OCLC 3083972 ↗, Act 4, scene 5:
      God yield thee, and God thank ye.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Gareth and Lynette
      The good mother holds me still a child! Good mother is bad mother unto me! A worse were better; yet no worse would I. Heaven yield her for it!
  2. To furnish; to afford; to render; to give forth.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 5”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      Vines yield nectar.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Job 24:5 ↗:
      The wilderness yieldeth food for them and for their children.
  3. To give way; to allow another to pass first.
    Yield the right of way to pedestrians.
  4. To give as required; to surrender, relinquish or capitulate.
    They refuse to yield to the enemy.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Sixt, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene i]:
      I'll make him yield the crown.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 11”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      Shall yield up all their virtue, all their fame.
  5. To give, or give forth, (anything).
    • circa 1610-11 William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act I scene ii:
      […] We'll visit Caliban, my slave, who never / Yields us kind answer.
  6. (intransitive) To give way; to succumb to a force.
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, Dracula, chapter 21:
      He turned the handle as he spoke, but the door did not yield. We threw ourselves against it. With a crash it burst open, and we almost fell headlong into the room.
  7. To produce as return, as from an investment.
    Historically, that security yields a high return.
  8. (mathematics) To produce as a result.
    Adding 3 and 4 yields a result of 7.
  9. (linguistics) To produce a particular sound as the result of a sound law.
    Indo-European p- yields Germanic f-.
  10. (engineering, materials science, of a material specimen) To pass the material's yield point and undergo plastic deformation.
  11. (rare) To admit to be true; to concede; to allow.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 11”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      I yield it just, said Adam, and submit.
Synonyms
  • submit - To fully surrender
  • capitulate - To end all resistance, may imply a compensation with an enemy or to end all resistance because of loss of hope
  • succumb - To fully surrender, because of helplessness and extreme weakness, to the leader of an opposing force
  • relent - A yielding because of pity or mercy
  • defer - A voluntary submitting out of respect, reverence or affection
  • give way - To succumb to persistent persuasion.
  • surrender - To give up into the power, control, or possession of another
  • cede - To give up, give way, give away
  • give up - To surrender
  • produce - To make (a thing) available to a person, an authority, etc.
  • bear - To produce something, such as fruit or crops
  • supply - To provide (something), to make (something) available for use
  • give in
  • to trade away - to let others get hold of a property or right of yours.
Translations Translations Translations Translations Noun

yield

  1. (obsolete) Payment; tribute.
  2. A product; the quantity of something produced.
    Zucchini plants always seem to produce a high yield of fruit.
  3. (law) The current return as a percentage of the price of a stock or bond.
  4. (finance) Profit earned from an investment; return on investment.
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations


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