yond
Adjective

yond (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) further; more distant
  2. (obsolete) yonder
    • c. 1608–1609, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedy of Coriolanus”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene 4], you yond coign o' the Capitol, yond corner-stone? page See you yond coign o' the Capitol, yond corner-stone? ↗:
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals), lines 46-48:
      Last night of all, / When yond same star that’s westward from the pole / Had made his course t' illume that part of heaven.
Adverb

yond (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) yonder
    • c. 1610-11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act I, Scene ii:
      The fringed curtains of thine eye advance, / And say what thou seest yond.
Adjective
  1. (obsolete) Furious; mad; angry; fierce.
    • Then wexeth wood and yond.



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