lear
Noun

lear

  1. (now Scotland) Something learned; a lesson.
  2. (now Scotland) Learning, lore; doctrine.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.vii:
      when all other helpes she saw to faile, / She turnd her selfe backe to her wicked leares / And by her deuilish arts thought to preuaile [...].
    • 1898, Francis James Child (editor), Lord William, or Lord Lundy, from Child's Ballads,
      They dressed up in maids' array,
      And passd for sisters fair;
      With ae consent gaed ower the sea,
      For to seek after lear.
Verb

lear (lears, present participle learing; past and past participle leared)

  1. (transitive, archaic and Scotland) To teach.
  2. (intransitive, archaic) To learn.
    • 14thC, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canon's Yeoman's Prologue and Tale, from The Canterbury Tales,
      He hath take on him many a great emprise,
      Which were full hard for any that is here
      To bring about, but they of him it lear.
Noun

lear (plural lears)

  1. Alternative form of lehr

Lear
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /lɪə/
  • (America) IPA: /lɪəɹ/
Proper noun
  1. Surname
  2. name of a legendary early king of Britain, the central character in Shakespeare's King Lear
Translations
  • Russian: Лир



This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.004
Offline English dictionary