stride
Pronunciation Verb

stride (strides, present participle striding; past strode, past participle stridden)

  1. (intransitive) To walk with long steps.
    • Mars in the middle of the shining shield / Is graved, and strides along the liquid field.
  2. To stand with the legs wide apart; to straddle.
  3. To pass over at a step; to step over.
    • 1611 April (first recorded performance), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Cymbeline”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene iii]:
      a debtor that not dares to stride a limit
  4. To straddle; to bestride.
    • c. 1608–1609, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedy of Coriolanus”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene ix]:
      I mean to stride your steed.
Translations Noun

stride

  1. (countable) A long step in walking.
  2. (countable) The distance covered by a long step.
  3. (countable, computing) The number of memory locations between successive elements in an array, pixels in a bitmap, etc.
    • 2007, Andy Oram, Greg Wilson, Beautiful Code
      This stride value is generally equal to the pixel width of the bitmap times the number of bytes per pixel, but for performance reasons it might be rounded […]
  4. (uncountable, music genre) A jazz piano style of the 1920s and 1930s. The left hand characteristically plays a four-beat pulse with a single bass note, octave, seventh or tenth interval on the first and third beats, and a chord on the second and fourth beats.
Translations
Stride
Proper noun
  1. Surname



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