unkindly
Adjective

unkindly

  1. Not kindly.
    1. Not kind#Adjective|kind, lacking in friendliness, warm-heartedness or sympathy.
      • 1850, Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter, Chapter 2,
        Preceded by the beadle, and attended by an irregular procession of stern-browed men and unkindly visaged women, Hester Prynne set forth towards the place appointed for her punishment.
      • 1906, E. Nesbit, The Railway Children, Chapter 4,
        […] she had seen a not unkindly wink pass between the two.
    2. (archaic) Rough, unfavourable, bad.
      • 1658, Thomas Browne, Hydriotaphia, Urn Burial, London: Henry Brome, “Cyrus-Garden, or The Quincunx Naturally Considered,” p. 130,
        From this superfluous pulp in unkindely, and wet years, may arise that multiplicity of little insects, which infest the Roots and Sprouts of tender Graines and pulses.
      • 1789, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, “Anthem for the Children of Christ’s Hospital” in The Poetical Works of S. T. Coleridge, London: William Pickering, 1834, Volume 1, p. 5,
        Unkindly cold and tempest shrill
        In life’s morn oft the traveller chill,
    3. (obsolete) Unnatural, contrary to the natural or proper order of things.
      • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, Book 1, Canto 1, p. 10,
        That detestable sight him much amazde,
        To see th’vnkindly Impes of heauen accurst,
        Deuoure their dam#Etymology_2|dam;
      • 1678, Robert Sanderson (theologian), Nine Cases of Conscience Occasionally Determined, London: H. Brome et al., p. 128,
        […] the want of mercy in a Father, is more unkindly, more unseemly, more unnatural than in another man […]
Adverb

unkindly

  1. In an unkind manner.
    • circa 1593 William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, Act III, Scene 1,
      Good master, take it not unkindly, pray,
      That I have been thus pleasant [i.e. joking] with you both.
    • 1722, Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders, London: W. Chetwood, p. ,
      […] I had over-heard them several times talking very Unkindly about me;
    • 1868, Louisa May Alcott, Little Women, Chapter 20,
      If she and John love one another, they can wait, and test the love by doing so. She is conscientious, and I have no fear of her treating him unkindly.
    • 1918, Rose Macaulay, What Not, London: Constable, Chapter 11, p. 222,
      Chester and Prideaux were dragged firmly but not unkindly down the stairs and out through the door.
  2. (obsolete) In an unnatural manner.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 3, lines 455-458,
      All th’ unaccomplisht works of Natures hand,
      Abortive, monstrous, or unkindly mixt,
      Dissolvd on earth, fleet hither, and in vain,
      Till final dissolution, wander here,
Antonyms


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