cockney
Noun

cockney (plural cockneys)

  1. a native or inhabitant of parts of the East End of London
    • 18, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter 3, in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, volume (please specify ), London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, OCLC 1069526323 ↗:
  2. the accent and speech mannerisms of these people
  3. (obsolete) An effeminate person; a spoilt child.
    • c. 1601–1602, William Shakespeare, “Twelfe Night, or VVhat You VVill”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene i]:
      This great lubber, the world, will prove a cockney.
Synonyms Translations
  • Portuguese: cockney
Adjective

cockney (not comparable)

  1. of, or relating to these people or their accent

Cockney
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /ˈkɒk.ni/
Adjective

cockney (not comparable)

  1. From the East End of London, or London generally
Noun

cockney (plural cockneys)

  1. (UK, slang) Any Londoner.
    • 1859, J.C. Hotten, A Dictionary of Modern Slang, Cant and Vulgar Words, 22 ↗
      COCKNEY, a native of London. An ancient nickname implying effeminacy, used by the oldest English writers, and derived from the imaginary fool's paradise, or lubberland, Cockaygne.
  2. (UK) A Londoner born within earshot of the city's Bow Bells, or (now, generically) any working-class Londoner.
    • 1617, Fynes Moryson, An Itinerary
      Londoners, and all within the sound of Bow Bell, are in reproach called Cockneys.
    • 1617, John Minsheu, Ductor in Linguas
      A Cockney or Cocksie, applied only to one born within the sound of Bow bell, that is in the City of London.
Proper noun
  1. The dialect or accent of such Londoners.



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