mickle
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /ˈmɪk(ə)l/
  • (GA) IPA: /ˈmɪkəl/
Adjective

mickle

  1. (archaic, now, chiefly, Scotland and Northern England, especially, Northumbria) (Very) great#Adjective|great or large.
    Synonyms: muckle
    • c. 1591–1595, [William Shakespeare], […] Romeo and Juliet. […] (First Quarto), London: Printed by Iohn Danter, published 1597, OCLC 503903918 ↗, [Act II, scene iii] ↗:
      Oh mickle is the powerfull grace that lies / In hearbes, plants, ſtones, and their true qualities: / For nought ſo vile, that vile on earth doth liue, / But to the earth ſome ſpeciall good doth giue: {{...}
Adverb

mickle

  1. (archaic, now, chiefly, Scotland) To a great extent.
    • 1814 July 6, [Walter Scott], chapter XIX, in Waverley; or, ’Tis Sixty Years Since. In Three Volumes, volume III, Edinburgh: Printed by James Ballantyne and Co. for Archibald Constable and Co.; London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, OCLC 270129598 ↗, page 282 ↗:
      That I wad wi' a' my heart; and mickle obliged to your honour for putting me in mind o' my bounden duty.
  2. (obsolete) Frequently, often.
Noun

mickle

  1. (archaic, chiefly, Scotland) A great#Adjective|great amount#Noun|amount.
    Many a little makes a mickle.
    • 1620, [Miguel de Cervantes]; Thomas Shelton, transl., “What Passed betwixt Don Quixote and His Squire, with Other Most Famous Accidents”, in The Second Part of the History of the Valorovs and Witty Knight-errant, Don Quixote of the Mancha. […], London: Printed [by Eliot’s Court Press] for Edward Blount, OCLC 606504853 ↗, page 41 ↗:
      In a word, I muſt know what I may gaine, little or much: for the henne layes aſwell vpon one egge as many, and many littles make a mickle, and whilſt ſomething is gotten, nothing is loſt.
  2. (archaic, Scotland, originally, erroneous) A small amount.
  3. (obsolete) Great or important people as a class#Noun|class.
  4. (obsolete) Greatness, largeness, stature.
Determiner
  1. (archaic, now, chiefly, Scotland and Northern England, especially, Northumbria) Much; a great quantity or amount of.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. […], London: Printed [by John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938 ↗, book III, canto VII, stanza 32, page 503 ↗:
      Full many wounds in his corrupted fleſh / He did engraue, and muchell blood did ſpend, / Yet might not doe him die, but aie more freſh / And fierce he ſtill appeard, the more he did them threſh.
  2. (archaic, now, chiefly, Scotland and Northumbria) Most; the majority of.
Pronoun
  1. (archaic, now, chiefly, Scotland) A great#Adjective|great extent or large amount#Noun|amount.

Mickle
Proper noun
  1. Surname



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