sheath
Pronunciation Noun

sheath (plural sheaths)

  1. A holster for a sword; a scabbard.
  2. (by extension) Anything that has a similar shape#Noun|shape to a scabbard that is use#Verb|used to hold#Verb|hold an object#Noun|object that is long#Adjective|longer than it is wide.
    Synonyms: case, casing, cover, covering, envelope
  3. (botany) The base#Noun|base of a leaf#Noun|leaf when sheathing or investing a branch#Noun|branch or stem#Noun|stem, as in grass#Noun|grasses.
  4. (electrical engineering) The insulating#Adjective|insulating outer cover#Noun|cover of an electrical cable#Noun|cable.
  5. (entomology) One of the elytra of an insect.
  6. (fashion) A tight-fitting dress#Noun|dress.
  7. (zoology) The foreskin of certain animals (for example, dog#Noun|dogs and horse#Noun|horses).
  8. (British, informal) A condom.
    Synonyms: Thesaurus:condom
Related terms Translations Translations
  • German: Hülle, Mantel, Ummantelung, Umhüllung
  • Spanish: cubierta exterior, envoltura exterior, funda exterior, vaina externa
Translations
  • French: fourreau, robe fourreau
  • German: Etuikleid
Translations Pronunciation Verb

sheath (sheaths, present participle sheathing; past and past participle sheathed)

  1. Alternative spelling of sheathe
    Antonyms: unsheath
    • c. 1591–1592, William Shakespeare, “The Third Part of Henry the Sixt, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene v], page 171 ↗, column 1:
      Nay, neuer beare me hence, diſpatch me heere: / Here ſheath thy Sword, Ile pardon thee my death: [...]
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Ivlivs Cæsar”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene iii], page 125 ↗, column 1:
      Sheath your Dagger: / Be angry when you will, it ſhall haue ſcope: [...]
    • 1687, [John Dryden], “The Third Part”, in The Hind and the Panther. A Poem, in Three Parts, 2nd edition, London: Printed for Jacob Tonson […], OCLC 460679539 ↗, page 88 ↗:
      So when the gen'rous Lyon has in ſight / His equal match, he rouſes for the fight; / But when his foe lyes proſtrate on the plain, / He ſheaths his paws, uncurls his angry mane; / And, plea'd with bloudleſs honours of the day, / Walks over, and diſdains th' inglorious Prey, [...]
    • [1716], [John] Gay, “Book III. Of Walking the Streets by Night.”, in Trivia: Or, The Art of Walking the Streets of London, London: Printed for Bernard Lintott, […], OCLC 13598122 ↗, page 53 ↗:
      At Sight of thee, the Villain ſheaths his Sword, / Nor ſcales the Wall, to ſteal the wealthy Hoard.



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