dun
Pronunciation Noun

dun (uncountable)

  1. A brownish grey colour.
     
Translations Adjective

dun (not comparable)

  1. Of a brownish grey colour#Noun|colour.
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene v], lines 48–49, page 134 ↗, column 2:
      Come, thick Night, / And pall thee in the dunneſt ſmoake of Hell, / That my keene Knife ſee not the Wound it makes, / Nor Heauen peepe through the Blanket of the darke, / To cry, hold, hold.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, “Sonnet 130”, in Shake-speares Sonnets. Neuer before Imprinted, London: By G[eorge] Eld for T[homas] T[horpe] and are to be sold by William Aspley, OCLC 216596634 ↗:
      My Miſtres eyes are nothing like the Sunne, / coral#English|Currall is farre more red, then her lips red, / If ſnow be white, why then her breſts are dun: / If hairs be wire#English|wiers, black wiers grow on her head: [...]
    • 1827, [John Keble], “Twenty-third Sunday after Trinity”, in The Christian Year: Thoughts in Verse for the Sundays and Holydays throughout the Year, volume II, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by W. Baxter, for J. Parker; and C[harles] and J[ohn] Rivington, […], OCLC 1029642537 ↗, page 85 ↗:
      Red o'er the forest glows the setting sun, / The line of yellow light dies fast away / That crown'd the eastern copse, and chill and dun / Falls on the moor the brief November day.
Translations Noun

dun (plural duns)

  1. (countable) A collector of debts.
    • 1933, George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London, Ch. 18:
      Melancholy duns came looking for him at all hours.
    • 1970, John Glassco, Memoirs of Montparnasse, New York 2007, p. 102:
      ‘Frank's worried about duns,’ she said as the butler went away.
  2. An urgent request or demand of payment.
Verb

dun (duns, present participle dunning; past and past participle dunned)

  1. (transitive) To ask or beset a debtor for payment.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, Folio Society 1973, p. 577:
      Of all he had received from Lady Bellaston, not above five guineas remained and that very morning he had been dunned by a tradesman for twice that sum.
  2. (transitive) To harass by continually repeating e.g. a request.
    • 1940, Raymond Chandler, Farewell, My Lovely, Penguin 2010, p. 107:
      Rich bitches who had to be dunned for their milk bills would pay him right now.
Translations Noun

dun (plural duns)

  1. (countable) A newly hatched, immature mayfly; a mayfly subimago.
  2. (countable, angling) A fly made to resemble the mayfly subimago.
Synonyms Noun

dun (plural duns)

  1. An ancient or medieval fortification; especially a hill-fort in Scotland or Ireland.
  2. (archeology) A structure in the Orkney or Shetland islands or in Scotland consisting of a roundhouse surrounded by a circular wall; a broch.
Verb
  1. (non-standard, informal) Eye dialect spelling of done#English|done: past participle of do#English|do
    Now, ya dun it!
  2. (non-standard, informal) Eye dialect spelling of don't#English|don't: contraction of do#English|do + not.
Verb

dun (duns, present participle dunning; past and past participle dunned)

  1. (transitive, dated) To cure, as codfish, by laying them, after salting, in a pile in a dark place, covered with saltgrass or a similar substance.
Noun

dun (plural duns)

  1. A mound or small hill.
Interjection
  1. (humorous) Imitating suspenseful music.

Dun
Proper noun
  1. A river in Wiltshire and Berkshire, England, which flows into the River Kennet.
  2. A river in Wiltshire and Hampshire, England, which flows into the River Test.
  3. An alternative name for the River Don in Yorkshire, England.
  4. A river in Antrim, Northern Ireland, alternatively named the Glendun River.
  5. A settlement/and/parish in Angus (OS grid ref NO6659).



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