cure
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /kjʊə(ɹ)/, /kjɔː(ɹ)/
  • (GA) enPR kyo͝or, IPA: /kjʊɹ/, /kjɝ/
  • (Norfolk) IPA: /kɜː(ɹ)/
Noun

cure (plural cures)

  1. A method, device or medication that restores good health.
  2. Act of healing or state of being healed; restoration to health after a disease, or to soundness after injury.
    • c. 1591–1595, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Romeo and Ivliet”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene i]:
      Past hope! past cure!
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Luke 13:32 ↗:
      I do cures to-day and to-morrow.
  3. (figurative) A solution to a problem.
    • Cold, hunger, prisons, ills without a cure.
    • the proper cure of such prejudices
  4. A process of preservation, as by smoking.
  5. A process of solidification or gelling.
  6. (engineering) A process whereby a material is caused to form permanent molecular linkages by exposure to chemicals, heat, pressure and/or weathering.
  7. (obsolete) Care, heed, or attention.
    • vicarages of great cure, but small value
  8. Spiritual charge; care of soul; the office of a parish priest or of a curate.
    • The appropriator was the incumbent parson, and had the cure of the souls of the parishioners.
  9. That which is committed to the charge of a parish priest or of a curate.
    Synonyms: curacy
Translations Translations
  • German: Pökelung
  • Spanish: curado
Translations
  • Russian: вулканиза́ция
Verb

cure (cures, present participle curing; past and past participle cured)

  1. (transitive) To restore to health.
    Synonyms: heal
    Unaided nature cured him.
  2. (transitive) To bring (a disease or its bad effects) to an end.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Sixt, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene i]:
      Whose smile and frown, like to Achilles' spear, / Is able with the change to kill and cure.
    Unaided nature cured his ailments.
  3. (transitive) To cause to be rid of (a defect).
    Experience will cure him of his naïveté.
  4. (transitive) To prepare or alter especially by chemical or physical processing for keeping or use.
    The smoke and heat cures the meat.
  5. (intransitive) To bring about a cure#Noun|cure of any kind.
  6. (intransitive) To be undergoing a chemical or physical process for preservation or use.
    The meat was put in the smokehouse to cure.
  7. To preserve (food), typically by salting
  8. (intransitive) To solidify or gel.
    The parts were curing in the autoclave.
  9. (obsolete, intransitive) To become healed.
    • c. 1591–1595, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Romeo and Ivliet”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene ii]:
      One desperate grief cures with another's languish.
  10. (obsolete) To pay heed; to care; to give attention.
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations
Cure
Proper noun
  1. Surname



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