envy
Pronunciation Noun

envy

  1. Resentful desire of something possessed by another or others (but not limited to material possessions). [from 13thc.]
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Samuel Simmons, line 263-4:
      No bliss enjoyed by us excites his envy more.
    • 1804, Alexander Pope, The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, page 71:
      Envy, to which the ignoble mind's a slave, / Is emulation in the learned or brave.
    • 1914, Louis Joseph Vance, Nobody, page 9:
      distilling therefrom an acid envy that robbed her napoleon of all its savour.
    • 1983, Stanley Rosen, Plato’s Sophist, page 66:
      Theodorus assures Socrates that no envy will prevent the Stranger from responding
  2. An object of envious notice or feeling.
    • 1843, Thomas Babington Macaulay, 1st Baron Macaulay, Critical and Miscellaneous Essays, Carey & Hart, page 277:
      This constitution in former days used to be the envy of the world[.]
    • 2008, Lich King, "Black Metal Sucks", Toxic Zombie Onslaught.
      quote en
  3. (obsolete) Hatred, enmity, ill-feeling. [14th-18thc.]
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, [http://quod.lib.umich.edu/c/cme/MaloryWks2/1:12.52?rgn=div2;view=fulltext chapter lij], in Le Morte Darthur, book X:
      Syre said laūcelot vnto Arthur by this crye that ye haue made ye wyll put vs that ben aboute yow in grete Ieopardy / for there be many Knyghtes that haue grete enuye to vs / therfore whan we shal mete at the daye of Iustes there wille be hard skyfte amonge vs
  4. (obsolete) Emulation; rivalry.
    • c. 1631-1636, John Ford, The Fancies Chaste and Noble
      Such as cleanliness and decency / Prompt to a virtuous envy.
  5. (obsolete) Public odium; ill repute.
    • 1611, Ben Jonson, Catiline His Conspiracy
      to lay the envy of the war upon Cicero
Translations Verb

envy

  1. (transitive) To feel displeasure or hatred towards (someone) for their good fortune or possessions. [from 14th c.]
  2. (obsolete, intransitive) To have envious feelings (at). [15th-18th c.]
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: […], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970 ↗, partition II, section 3, member 3:
      I do not envy at their wealth, titles, offices; […] let me live quiet and at ease.
    • Who would envy at the prosperity of the wicked?
  3. (obsolete, transitive) To give (something) to (someone) grudgingly or reluctantly; to begrudge. [16th-18th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.v:
      But that sweet Cordiall, which can restore / A loue-sick hart, she did to him enuy […].
  4. (obsolete) To show malice or ill will; to rail.
    • c. 1608–1609, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedy of Coriolanus”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene iii]:
      He has […] envied against the people.
  5. (obsolete) To do harm to; to injure; to disparage.
    • If I make a lie / To gain your love and envy my best mistress, / Put me against a wall.
  6. (obsolete) To hate.
  7. (obsolete) To emulate.
Related terms Translations


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