sass
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /sæs/
Noun

sass (uncountable)

  1. (US) Backtalk, cheek, sarcasm.
    • 1876, Mark Twain [pseudonym; Samuel Langhorne Clemens], chapter I, in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Hartford, Conn.: The American Publishing Company, OCLC 1000326417 ↗, page 23 ↗:
      Say—if you give me much more of your sass I'll take and bounce a rock off'n your head.
    • 1884 December 9, Mark Twain [pseudonym; Samuel Langhorne Clemens], chapter V, in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: (Tom Sawyer’s Comrade) […], London: Chatto & Windus, […], OCLC 458431182 ↗, page 33 ↗:
      Looky here—mind how you talk to me; I’m a-standing about all I can stand now—so don’t gimme no sass.
  2. (archaic) Vegetables used in making sauces.
Translations Verb

sass (sasses, present participle sassing; past and past participle sassed)

  1. (intransitive, US, informal) To talk#Verb|talk, to talk back.
    • 1884 December 9, Mark Twain [pseudonym; Samuel Langhorne Clemens], chapter XXXI, in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: (Tom Sawyer’s Comrade) […], London: Chatto & Windus, […], OCLC 458431182 ↗, page 316 ↗:
      The duke he begun to abuse him for an old fool, and the king begun to sass back; and the minute they was fairly at it, I lit out, and shook the reefs out of my hind legs, and spun down the river road like a deer—for I see our chance; and I made up my mind that it would be a long day before they ever see me and Jim again.
    • 1894, Mark Twain, Tom Sawyer Abroad
      “But, good land! what did he want to sass back for? You see, it couldn’t do him no good, and it was just nuts for them.”
  2. (transitive, US, informal) To speak insolently to.
    Don’t sass your teachers!
Translations
Sass
Proper noun
  1. (Web design) Initialism of Syntactically Awesome Stylesheets a style sheet language



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