blast
Pronunciation Noun

blast (plural blasts)

  1. A violent gust of wind.
    • And see where surly Winter passes off, / Far to the north, and calls his ruffian blasts; / His blasts obey, and quit the howling hill.
  2. A forcible stream of gas or liquid from an orifice, for example from a bellows, the mouth, etc.
  3. A hit from a pipe.
  4. The continuous blowing to which one charge of ore or metal is subjected in a furnace
    many tons of iron were melted at a blast
    • 1957, H.R. Schubert, History of the British Iron and Steel Industry, p. 146:
      Blast was produced by bellows worked by four 'blowers', three of whom worked at a time while the fourth stood ready to replace one of the others.
  5. The exhaust steam from an engine, driving a column of air out of a boiler chimney, and thus creating an intense draught through the fire; also, any draught produced by the blast.
  6. An explosion, especially for the purpose of destroying a mass of rock, etc.
  7. An explosive charge for blasting.
    • Large blasts are often used.
  8. A loud, sudden sound.
    • 1810, Walter Scott, The Lady of the Lake; a Poem, Edinburgh: Printed [by James Ballantyne and Co.] for John Ballantyne and Co.; London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, and William Miller, OCLC 6632529 ↗, (please specify the canto number)(please specify the stanza number):
      One blast upon his bugle horn / Were worth a thousand men.
    • the blast of triumph o'er thy grave
    • 1884 December 9, Mark Twain [pseudonym; Samuel Langhorne Clemens], chapter VIII, in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: (Tom Sawyer’s Comrade) […], London: Chatto & Windus, […], OCLC 458431182 ↗, page 60 ↗:
      Then the captain sung out: ¶ "Stand away!" and the cannon let off such a blast right before me that it made me deef with the noise and pretty near blind with the smoke, and I judged I was gone.
  9. A sudden, pernicious effect, as if by a noxious wind, especially on animals and plants; a blight.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Job 4:9 ↗:
      By the blast of God they perish, and by the breath of his nostrils are they consumed.
    • c. 1607–1608, William Shakeſpeare, The Late, And much admired Play, Called Pericles, Prince of Tyre. […], London: Imprinted at London for Henry Goſſon,  […], published 1609, OCLC 78596089 ↗, [Act V, scene iii]:
      Vertue preferd from fell deſtuctions blaſt,
  10. (figuratively, informal) A good time; an enjoyable moment.
    We had a blast at the party last night.
  11. (marketing) A promotional message sent to an entire mailing list.
    an e-mail blast; a fax blast
  12. A flatulent disease of sheep.
Translations Translations
  • Italian: getto
  • Russian: дутьё
Translations Translations
  • Italian: squillo
  • Russian: гро́хот
Verb

blast (blasts, present participle blasting; past and past participle blasted)

  1. (transitive) To make an impression on, by making a loud blast or din.
    • c. 1606–1607, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene viii]:
      Trumpeters, / With brazen din blast you the city's ear.
  2. (intransitive) To make a loud noise.
  3. (transitive) To shatter, as if by an explosion.
  4. (transitive) To open up a hole in, usually by means of a sudden and imprecise method (such as an explosion).
    Blast right through it.
  5. (transitive) To curse; to damn.
    Blast it! Foiled again.
  6. (transitive) (sci-fi) To shoot, especially with an energy weapon (as opposed to one which fires projectiles).
    Chewbacca blasted the Stormtroopers with his laser rifle.
  7. (soccer) To shoot; kick the ball in hope of scoring a goal.
  8. To criticize or reprimand severely; to verbally discipline or punish.
    My manager suddenly blasted me yesterday for being a little late to work for five days in a row, because I was never getting myself up on time.
  9. (transitive) To blight or wither.
    A cold wind blasted the rose plants.
  10. (intransitive, obsolete) To be blighted or withered.
    The bud blasted in the blossom.
  11. (obsolete, intransitive) To blow, for example on a trumpet.
Translations
  • Russian: греме́ть
Translations
  • Russian: взрыва́ть
Translations
  • Russian: проклина́ть
Translations
  • Russian: раскритикова́ть
Interjection
  1. (UK, informal) To show displeasure; damn
Translations Noun

blast (plural blasts)

  1. (cytology) An immature or undifferentiated cell (e.g., lymphoblast, myeloblast).
Translations Verb

blast (blasts, present participle blasting; past and past participle blasted)

  1. (biology, informal, transitive) To run a nucleotide sequence (for nucleic acids) or an amino acid sequence (for proteins) through a BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool).
    • 2004, Andreas Bommarius and ‎Bettina Riebel-Bommarius, Biocatalysis: Fundamentals and Applications, p. 425:
      Blasting nucleotide sequences is not always that easy, because there is more ambiguity to the nucleotide sequence, and good hits have to have a 70% homology over the whole sequence to be reliable, compared to 25% with proteins.

BLAST
Noun

blast (uncountable)

  1. (biology) An algorithm which compares similarities between sequences of nucleotides in nucleic acids or of amino acids in proteins.
Verb

blast (blasts, present participle blasting; past and past participle blasted)

  1. (biology, informal, transitive) Alternative letter-case form of blast (to run a sequence through BLAST)
    • 2006, Guy Caldwell, ‎Shelli Williams, ‎and Kim Caldwell, Integrated Genomics: A Discovery-Based Laboratory Course, p. 85:
      This program is also capable of BLASTing sequencing results and works with most automated sequencing formats, alleviating the need for conversion of PC-based files.



This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.016
Offline English dictionary