haggard
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /ˈhæɡ.əd/
  • (America) enPR: hăg-ərd' IPA: /ˈhæɡ.ɚd/
Adjective

haggard

  1. Looking exhausted, worried, or poor in condition
    • Staring his eyes, and haggard was his look.
    Pale and haggard faces.
    A gradual descent into a haggard and feeble state.
    The years of hardship made her look somewhat haggard.
  2. Wild or untamed
    a haggard or refractory hawk
Translations Translations Noun

haggard (plural haggards)

  1. (falconry) A hunting bird captured as an adult.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare}, Much Ado About Nothing, Act 3 Scene 1
      No, truly, Ursula, she is too disdainful;
      I know her spirits are as coy and wild
      As haggards of the rock.
  2. (falconry) A young or untrained hawk or falcon.
  3. (obsolete) A fierce, intractable creature.
    • c. 1590–1592, William Shakespeare, “The Taming of the Shrew”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene ii]:
      I have loved this proud disdainful haggard.
  4. (obsolete) A hag.
Noun

haggard (plural haggards)

  1. (dialect, Isle of Man, Ireland, Scotland) A stackyard, an enclosure on a farm for stacking grain, hay, etc.
    He tuk a slew [swerve] round the haggard

Haggard
Proper noun
  1. Surname
  2. An unincorporated community in Gray County, Kansas.



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