mold
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /məʊld/, /mɔʊld/
  • (America) IPA: /moʊld/
Noun

mold (American spelling)

  1. A hollow form or matrix for shaping a fluid or plastic substance.
  2. A frame or model around or on which something is formed or shaped.
  3. Something that is made in or shaped on a mold.
  4. The shape or pattern of a mold.
  5. General shape or form.
    the oval mold of her face
    • 1711, Alexander Pope, "The Temple of Fame", in The Works of Alexander Pope: New Ed. Including Several Hundred Unpublished Letters, and Other New Materials, Collected in Part by John Wilson Croker. With Introd. and Notes by Whitwell Elwin, Volume 1, J.Murray, p.206
      Crowned with an architrave of antique mould.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314 ↗, page 0108 ↗:
      This new-comer was a man who in any company would have seemed striking. […] Indeed, all his features were in large mold, like the man himself, as though he had come from a day when skin garments made the proper garb of men.
  6. Distinctive character or type.
    a leader in the mold of her predecessors
  7. A fixed or restrictive pattern or form.
    His method of scientific investigation broke the mold and led to a new discovery.
  8. (architecture) A group of moldings.
    the arch mold of a porch or doorway;  the pier mold of a Gothic pier, meaning the whole profile, section, or combination of parts
  9. (anatomy) A fontanelle.
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Verb

mold (molds, present participle molding; past and past participle molded) (American spelling)

  1. (transitive) To shape in or on a mold; to form into a particular shape; to give shape to.
    • 1978, Job 10:8-9, Old Testament, New International Version:
      Your hands shaped me and made me … Remember that you molded me like clay.
  2. (transitive) To guide or determine the growth or development of; influence
    • 1963. Haile Selassie (translated)
      It is you who must mold the minds of your students that they may be wise, farsighted, intelligent, profound in their thinking, devoted to their country and government and fruitful in their work. It is you who must sense as the example.
  3. (transitive) To fit closely by following the contours of.
  4. (transitive) To make a mold of or from (molten metal, for example) before casting.
  5. (transitive) To ornament with moldings.
  6. (intransitive) To be shaped in or as if in a mold.
    These shoes gradually molded to my feet.
Translations Translations
  • Portuguese: modelar
  • Russian: лепи́ть
Translations
  • Portuguese: moldar-se a
Noun

mold (American spelling)

  1. A natural substance in the form of a woolly or furry growth of tiny fungi that appears when organic material lies for a long time exposed to (usually warm and moist) air.
Translations Verb

mold (molds, present participle molding; past and past participle molded) (American spelling)

  1. (transitive) To cause to become moldy; to cause mold to grow upon.
  2. (intransitive) To become moldy; to be covered or filled, in whole or in part, with a mold.
Noun

mold (American spelling)

  1. Loose friable soil, rich in humus and fit for planting.
  2. (UK, dialectal, chiefly plural) Earth, ground.
Translations
  • Spanish: tierra blanda
Verb

mold (molds, present participle molding; past and past participle molded) (American spelling)

  1. To cover with mold or soil.



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