pandemic
Pronunciation
  • (RP, GA) IPA: /pænˈdɛmɪk/
Adjective

pandemic

  1. (epidemiology) Of a disease#Noun|disease: epidemic#Adjective|epidemic over a wide geographical area and affect#Verb|affecting a large proportion of the population; also, of or pertaining to a disease of this nature.
    Synonyms: pandemial, pandemical, panepidemic
    Antonyms: nonpandemic
    World War I might have continued indefinitely if not for a pandemic outbreak of influenza.
  2. (usually, derogatory) general#Adjective|General, widespread.
    Synonyms: common, ubiquitous, universal, Thesaurus:widespread
Related terms

Translations
  • German: pandemisch
  • Italian: pandemico
  • Portuguese: pandémico (Portugal), pandêmico (Brazil)
  • Russian: пандеми́ческий
  • Spanish: pandémico
Noun

pandemic (plural pandemics)

  1. (epidemiology) A pandemic disease#Noun|disease; a disease that affect#Verb|affects a wide geographical area and a large proportion of the population.
    Synonyms: pandemia, Thesaurus:pandemic
Translations Adjective

pandemic (not comparable)

  1. (Greek mythology, Roman mythology, rare) Alternative letter-case form of Pandemic#English|Aphrodite Pandemos}}, the earthly [[aspect of the Greek#Adjective|Greek goddess of beauty and love#Noun|love Aphrodite and her Roman#Adjective|Roman counterpart Venus, as contrast#Verb|contrasted with the heavenly aspect known as {{w]] (“of {{w”)

Pandemic
Pronunciation
  • (RP, GA) IPA: /pænˈdɛmɪk/
Adjective

pandemic (not comparable)

  1. (Greek mythology, Roman mythology) Of Aphrodite Pandemos, the earthly aspect of the Greek#Adjective|Greek goddess of beauty and love#Noun|love Aphrodite and her Roman#Adjective|Roman counterpart Venus, as contrast#Verb|contrasted with the heavenly aspect known as Aphrodite Urania: earthly, physical#Adjective|physical, sensual.
    Synonyms: pandemian
    Antonyms: heavenly, spiritual, Uranian
    • 1852 January – 1853 April, Charles Kingsley, Jun., “She Stoops to Conquer”, in Hypatia: Or, New Foes with an Old Face. […] In Two Volumes, volume II, London: John W[illiam] Parker and Son, […], published 1853, OCLC 1932017 ↗, page 109 ↗:
      That was spoken of the celestial Aphrodite, whose symbol is the tortoise, the emblem of domestic modesty and chastity: not of that baser Pandemic one.



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