reverberate
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ɹɪˈvɜː(ɹ).bəɹ.eɪt/
Verb

reverberate (reverberates, present participle reverberating; past and past participle reverberated)

  1. (intransitive) to ring with many echos
  2. (intransitive) to have a lasting effect
  3. (intransitive) to repeatedly return
  4. To return or send back; to repel or drive back; to echo, as sound; to reflect, as light, as light or heat.
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Troylus and Cressida”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene iii]:
      who, like an arch, reverberates the voice again
  5. To send or force back; to repel from side to side.
    Flame is reverberated in a furnace.
  6. To fuse by reverberated heat.
    • 1643, Thomas Browne, Religio Medici
      reverberated into glass
  7. (intransitive) to rebound or recoil
  8. (intransitive) to shine or reflect (from a surface, etc.)
  9. (obsolete) to shine or glow (on something) with reflected light
Related terms Translations
  • German: nachhallen, nachklingen, nachdröhnen
  • Italian: riecheggiare
  • Russian: раздава́ться
  • Spanish: reverberar
Translations Translations
  • Spanish: reverberar
Adjective

reverberate

  1. reverberant
    • c. 1601–1602, William Shakespeare, “Twelfe Night, or VVhat You VVill”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene v]:
      the reverberate hills
  2. Driven back, as sound; reflected.
    • With the reverberate sound the spacious air did fill



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