rout
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ɹaʊt/
  • (Canada) IPA: [ɹʌʊt]
Verb

rout (routs, present participle routing; past and past participle routed)

  1. (intransitive) To make a noise; roar; bellow; snort.
  2. (intransitive) To snore; snore loudly.
    • c. 1300, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Reeve's Tale
      Men myghte hir rowtyng heere two furlong
  3. (intransitive) To belch.
  4. (intransitive) To howl as the wind; make a roaring noise.
Noun

rout (plural routs)

  1. A noise, especially a loud one
    • 1759-1767, Laurence Sterne, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman
      This new book the whole world makes such a rout about.
  2. A disturbance; tumult.
    • 1856, Richard Chenevix Trench, Poems, A Walk in a Churchyard
      "My child, it is not well," I said, / "Among the graves to shout; / To laugh and play among the dead, / And make this noisy rout."
  3. Snoring.
Verb

rout (routs, present participle routing; past and past participle routed)

  1. (transitive, now chiefly, dialectal) To beat; strike; assail with blows.
Noun

rout (plural routs)

  1. (now chiefly, dialectal) A violent movement; a great or violent stir; a heavy blow; a stunning blow; a stroke.
1598, "disorderly retreat," borrowed from Middle French route, roupte ("disorderly flight of troops"), literally "a breaking off, rupture," from Vulgar Latin *rupta, literally "a broken group," from Latin rupta, feminine past participle of rumpo ("to break") (see rupture). Noun

rout (plural routs)

  1. A troop or group, especially of a traveling company or throng.
    • A rout of people there assembled were.
  2. A disorderly and tumultuous crowd; a mob; hence, the rabble; the herd of common people.
    • the endless routs of wretched thralls
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Sixt, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene i]:
      the ringleader and head of all this rout
    • 1662, [Samuel Butler], “[The First Part of Hudibras]”, in Hudibras. The First and Second Parts. […], London: Printed by T[homas] N[ewcomb] for John Martyn and Henry Herringman, […], published 1678, OCLC 890163163 ↗; republished in A[lfred] R[ayney] Waller, editor, Hudibras: Written in the Time of the Late Wars, Cambridge: At the University Press, 1905, OCLC 963614346 ↗, canto I, page 3 ↗:
      When Gospel-Trumpeter surrounded, / With long-ear'd rout to Battel sounded, / And Pulpit, Drum Ecclesiastick, / Was beat with fist, instead of a stick:
    • 1671, John Milton, “Samson Agonistes, […]”, in Paradise Regain’d. A Poem. In IV Books. To which is Added, Samson Agonistes, London: Printed by J. M[acock] for John Starkey […], OCLC 228732398 ↗, line 675, [https://archive.org/stream/paradiseregaindp00milt_0#page/{}/mode/1up page 44]:
      Nor do I name of men the common rout,
    • 1928, H. P. Lovecraft, "The Call of Cthulhu", Weird Tales, Vol. 11, No. 2, pages 159–178, 287:
      […] although there must have been nearly a hundred mongrel celebrants in the throng, the police relied on their firearms and plunged determinedly into the nauseous rout.
  3. The state of being disorganized and thrown into confusion, especially when retreating from a fight.
    • Thy army […] / Dispersed in rout, betook them all to fly.
  4. The act of defeating and breaking up an army or another opponent.
    The rout of the enemy was complete.
    • 1718, Homer; [Alexander] Pope, transl., “Book XIII”, in The Iliad of Homer, volume IV, London: Printed by W[illiam] Bowyer, for Bernard Lintott between the Temple-Gates, OCLC 670734254 ↗, line 393, page 21 ↗:
      To theſe, glad Conqueſt, murd'rous Rout to thoſe.
  5. (legal) A disturbance of the peace by persons assembled together with the intent to do a thing which, if executed, would make them rioters, and actually making a motion toward the executing thereof.
  6. A fashionable assembly, or large evening party.
    • 1824, Walter Savage Landor, Imaginary Conversations, Vol. I, "Southey and Porson":
      The ancients have always been opposed to them; just as, at routs and dances, elderly beauties to younger.
    • 1832, "The Premier and his Wife: A Story of the Great World," Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Vol. XXXI. No. CLXXXIX (January 1832):
      The envoys were not often compelled to forego the toilet for the desk, nor the beaux secretaires, to give up their lessons on the guitar for the drudgery of copying dispatches. A “protocol” would have scared the gentle state from its propriety; and the arrival of the Morning Post, once a week from London, with the account of routs in which they had not shared, and the anticipation of dinners and déjeúnés which they were never to enjoy, was the only pain which Diplomacy suffered to raise a ripple on the tranquil surface of its soul.
    • 1848, William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, Chapter 23:
      By a little inquiry regarding his mother's engagements, he was pretty soon able to find out by whom of her ladyship's friends parties were given at that season; where he would be likely to meet Osborne's sisters; and, though he had that abhorrence of routs and evening parties which many sensible men, alas! entertain, he soon found one where the Misses Osborne were to be present.
Translations
  • Russian: сброд
Translations
  • French: raout
  • Russian: ра́ут
Verb

rout (routs, present participle routing; past and past participle routed)

  1. (transitive) To defeat completely, forcing into disorderly retreat.
    • That party […] that charged the Scots, so totally routed and defeated their whole army, that they fled.
    • 2009 January 30, Adam Entous, "Mitchell warns of setbacks ahead in Mideast talks ↗" (news article), Reuters:
      Israel tightened its blockade of the Gaza Strip after Hamas routed secular Fatah forces loyal to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and seized control of the enclave in June 2007.
  2. (intransitive) To retreat from a confrontation in disorder.
    • 2005, Brian Todd Carey, Joshua Allfree, John Cairns, Warfare in the Ancient World, Pen and Sword, ISBN 1848846304.
      quote en
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To assemble in a crowd, whether orderly or disorderly; to collect in company.
Translations
  • Russian: разби́ть на́голову
Verb

rout (routs, present participle routing; past and past participle routed)

  1. To search or root in the ground, like a pig.
  2. To scoop out with a gouge or other tool; to furrow.
  3. To use a router in woodworking.
Noun

rout (plural routs)

  1. The brent goose.



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