scabrous
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /ˈskeɪbɹəs/, /ˈska-/
  • (GA) IPA: /ˈskæbɹəs/, /ˈskeɪ-/
Adjective

scabrous

  1. Covered with scales or scabs; hence, very coarse or rough.
    Synonyms: scabby, scaly, scurfy, Thesaurus:scabby, Thesaurus:rough
    After the incident with the gasoline, Noel’s burnt arm remained scabrous, and was susceptible to infections.
  2. (figurative) Disgusting, repellent.
    Synonyms: repulsive, vile, Thesaurus:unpleasant
    The novel was a flagrantly scabrous bodice-ripper, and Rachael was ashamed to read it in public.
  3. (figurative) Of music, writing, etc.: lacking refinement; unmelodious, unmusical.
    Synonyms: harsh, rough, Thesaurus:cacophonous
    • 1693, John Dryden, “The Dedication”, in Juvenal; Persius; John Dryden, [William Congreve, and Nahum Tate], transl., The Satires of Decimus Junius Juvenalis. Translated into English Verse. […], London: Printed for Jacob Tonson […], OCLC 80026745, page xxx ↗:
      [A]s his Verse is ſcabrous, and hobbling, and his Words not every where well choſen, the purity of Latin being more corrupted, than in the time of Juvenal, and conſequently of Horace, who writ when the Language was in the heighth of its perfection; ſo his diction is hard; his Figures are generally too bold and daring; and his Tropes, particularly his Metaphors, inſufferably ſtrain'd.
  4. (figurative) Difficult, thorny, troublesome.
  5. (figurative, chiefly, US) Covered with a crust#Noun|crust of dirt or grime.
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