cadence
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ˈkeɪ.dn̩s/
Noun

cadence

  1. The act or state of declining or sinking.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 10”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      Now was the sun in western cadence low.
  2. Balanced, rhythmic flow.
    • c. 1595–1596, William Shakespeare, “Loues Labour’s Lost”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene ii]:
      You find not the apostrophas, and so miss the accent:
      let me supervise the canzonet. Here are only numbers ratified;
      but, for the elegancy, facility, and golden cadence of poesy,
      caret.
  3. The measure or beat of movement.
  4. The general inflection or modulation of the voice, or of any sound.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 2”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      Blustering winds, which all night long / Had roused the sea, now with hoarse cadence lull / Seafaring men o'erwatched.
    • 1815 February 23, [Walter Scott], Guy Mannering; or, The Astrologer. [...] In Three Volumes, volume (please specify ), Edinburgh: Printed by James Ballantyne and Co. for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, […]; and Archibald Constable and Co., […], OCLC 742335644 ↗:
  5. (music) A progression of at least two chords which conclude a piece of music, section or musical phrases within it. Sometimes referred to analogously as musical punctuation.
  6. (music) A cadenza, or closing embellishment; a pause before the end of a strain, which the performer may fill with a flight of fancy.
  7. (speech) A fall in inflection of a speaker’s voice, such as at the end of a sentence.
  8. (dance) A dance move which ends a phrase.
    The cadence in a galliard step refers to the final leap in a cinquepace sequence.
  9. (fencing) The rhythm and sequence of a series of actions.
  10. (running) The number of steps per minute.
  11. (cycling) The number of revolutions per minute of the cranks or pedals of a bicycle.
  12. (military) A chant that is sung by military personnel while running or marching; a jody call.
  13. (heraldry) cadency
  14. (horse-riding) Harmony and proportion of movement, as in a well-managed horse.
Synonyms Related terms Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • German: Tonfall
  • Russian: пониже́ние
Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • German: Rhythmus, Pedaltakt, Trittfrequenz
  • Portuguese: pedalagem
  • Russian: каденс
Translations Verb

cadence (cadences, present participle cadencing; past and past participle cadenced)

  1. To give a cadence to.
  2. To give structure to.

Cadence
Proper noun
  1. A female given name, taken to use in the 2000s.



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