inform
Pronunciation
  • (GA) IPA: /ɪnˈfɔɹm/
  • (RP) IPA: /ɪnˈfɔːm/
Verb

inform (informs, present participle informing; past and past participle informed)

  1. (archaic, transitive) To instruct, train (usually in matters of knowledge).
  2. (transitive) To communicate knowledge to.
    • For he would learn their business secretly, / And then inform his master hastily.
    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene i]:
      I am informed thoroughly of the cause.
  3. (intransitive) To impart information or knowledge.
  4. To act as an informer; denounce.
  5. (transitive) To give form or character to; to inspire (with a given quality); to affect, influence (with a pervading principle, idea etc.).
    His sense of religion informs everything he writes.
    • Let others better mould the running mass / Of metals, and inform the breathing brass.
    • Breath informs this fleeting frame.
  6. (obsolete, intransitive) To make known, wisely and/or knowledgeably.
  7. (obsolete, transitive) To direct, guide.
  8. (archaic, intransitive) To take form; to become visible or manifest; to appear.
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene i]:
      It is the bloody business which informs / Thus to mine eyes.
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations Translations Adjective

inform (not comparable)

  1. Without regular form; shapeless; ugly; deformed.



This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.004
Offline English dictionary