muse
Pronunciation
    • (British) IPA: /mjuːz/
    • (America) IPA: /mjuz/
Noun

muse (plural muses)

  1. A source of inspiration.
  2. (archaic) A poet; a bard.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 85:
      My toung-tide Muſe in manners holds her ſtill,
      While comments of your praiſe richly compil'd,
      Reſerue their Character with goulden quill,
      And precious phraſe by all the Muſes fil'd.
Synonyms Related terms Translations Verb

muse (muses, present participle musing; past and past participle mused)

  1. (intransitive) To become lost in thought, to ponder.
  2. (transitive) To say (something) with due consideration or thought.
  3. (transitive) To think on; to meditate on.
    • Thomson
      Come, then, expressive Silence, muse his praise.
  4. (transitive) To wonder at.
    • {{RQ:Shakespeare Verona|1|3|passage=Muse not that I thus suddenly proceed; for what I will, I will, and there an end.
Synonyms Related terms Translations Translations Translations Noun

muse (plural muses)

  1. An act of musing; a period of thoughtfulness.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.xii:
      still he sate long time astonished / As in great muse, ne word to creature spake.
    • 1978, Lawrence Durrell, Livia, Faber & Faber 1992 (Avignon Quintet), p. 416:
      He fell into a muse and pulled his upper lip.
Noun

muse (plural muses)

  1. A gap or hole in a hedge, fence, etc. through which a wild animal is accustomed to pass; a muset.
    Find a hare without a muse. (old proverb)

Muse
Pronunciation Noun

muse (plural muses)

  1. One of the nine Ancient Greek deities of the arts.
    • 1645, John Milton, Il Penseroso:
      And hears the Muſes in a ring,
      Ay round about Joves Altar ſing.
Related terms Translations


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