clamor
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /ˈklæm.ə/
  • (America) IPA: /ˈklæm.ɚ/
Noun

clamor (American spelling)

  1. A great outcry or vociferation; loud and continued shouting or exclamation.
    • 1700, [John] Dryden, “Palamon and Arcite: Or, The Knight’s Tale. In Three Books.”, in Fables Ancient and Modern; […], London: Printed for Jacob Tonson, […], OCLC 228732415 ↗, book I, page 17 ↗:
      For when he knew his Rival freed and gone, / He ſwells with Wrath; he makes outrageous Moan: / He frets, he fumes, he ſtares, he ſtamps the Ground; / The hollow Tow'r with Clamours rings around: {{...}
  2. Any loud and continued noise.
  3. A continued public expression, often of dissatisfaction or discontent; a popular outcry.
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations Verb

clamor (clamors, present participle clamoring; past and past participle clamored) (American spelling)

  1. (intransitive) To cry out and/or demand.
    Anyone who tastes our food seems to clamor for more.
  2. (transitive) To demand by outcry.
    Thousands of demonstrators clamoring the government's resignation were literally deafening, yet their cries fell in deaf ears
    • 2013 September 28, Kenan Malik, "London Is Special, but Not That Special ↗," New York Times (retrieved 28 September 2013):
      The distinctness of London has led many to clamor for the capital to pursue its own policies, especially on immigration. The British prime minister, David Cameron, is a Conservative. So is the mayor of London, Boris Johnson. But they have diametrically opposed views on immigration.
  3. (intransitive) To become noisy insistently.
    After a confused murmur the audience soon clamored
  4. (transitive) To influence by outcry.
    His many supporters successfully clamor his election without a formal vote
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To silence.
Synonyms
  • (to cry out) din
Translations Translations
  • German: mit lautem Geschrei fordern
Translations


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