cock
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /kɒk/
  • (America) enPR: käk, IPA: /kɑk/
Noun

cock

  1. A male bird, especially:
    1. A rooster: a male gallinaceous bird, especially a male domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus).
      • 14th c, Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales: The Nun's Priest's Tale,
        A yerd she hadde, enclosed al aboute / With stikkes, and a drye dich with-oute, / In which she hadde a cok, hight Chauntecleer, / In al the land of crowing nas his peer.
    2. A cock pigeon.
  2. A valve or tap for controlling flow in plumbing.
  3. The hammer of a firearm trigger mechanism.
  4. The notch of an arrow or crossbow.
  5. (colloquial, vulgar) The penis.
  6. (curling) The circle at the end of the rink.
  7. The state of being cocked; an upward turn, tilt or angle.
  8. (British, NZ, pejorative, slang) A stupid person.
  9. (British, pejorative, slang, uncountable) Nonsense; rubbish.
  10. (informal, British, Tasmania) Term of address.
    All right, cock?
  11. A boastful tilt of one's head or hat.
  12. (informal) shuttlecock
  13. A vane in the shape of a cock; a weathercock.
    • 1623, William Shakespeare, King Lear, Act 3, Scene 2, 1992, Jay L. Halio (editor), The Tragedy of King Lear, Cambridge University Press, 2005, [https://books.google.com.au/books?id=McE2AAAAQBAJ&pg=PA177&dq=%22Drenched+our+steeples,+drowned+the+cocks%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjG-tSm28PbAhWGopQKHQkTDwUQ6AEIJzAA#v=onepage&q=%22Drenched%20our%20steeples%2C%20drowned%20the%20cocks%22&f=false page 177],
      Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! Rage! blow! / You cataracts and hurricanoes, spout / Till you have drenched our steeples, drowned the cocks!
  14. (dated, humorous) A chief man; a leader or master.
    • Sir Andrew is the cock of the club, since he left us.
  15. The crow of a cock, especially the first crow in the morning; cockcrow.
    • 1623, William Shakespeare, King Lear, Act 3, Scene 4, 1821, The Plays and Poems of William Shakspeare, [https://books.google.com.au/books?id=QDtMAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA159&dq=%22He+begins+at+curfew,+and+walks+till+the+first+cock.%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwin3YGn5MPbAhUMWLwKHU1AD_YQ6AEINTAC#v=onepage&q=%22He%20begins%20at%20curfew%2C%20and%20walks%20till%20the%20first%20cock.%22&f=false page 159],
      This is the foul fiend Flibbertigibbet: he begins at curfew, and walks till the first cock;
  16. The style or gnomon of a sundial.
  17. The indicator of a balance.
  18. The bridge piece that affords a bearing for the pivot of a balance in a clock or watch.
Synonyms Related terms Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Verb

cock (cocks, present participle cocking; past and past participle cocked)

  1. (ambitransitive) To lift the cock of a firearm or crossbow; to prepare (a gun or crossbow) to be fired.
    • 1812', Lord Byron, The Waltz
      Cocked, fired, and missed his man.
  2. (intransitive) To be prepared to be triggered by having the cock lifted.
    In the darkness, the gun cocked loudly.
  3. (transitive) To erect; to turn up.
    • 1720, John Gay, Thursday: Or, The Spell
      Our Lightfoot barks, and cocks his ears.
    • 1728, Jonathan Swift, A Dialogue Between Mad Mullinix and Timothy
      Dick would cock his nose in scorn.
  4. (British, transitive, slang) To copulate with.
  5. (transitive) To turn or twist something upwards or to one side; to lift or tilt (e.g. headwear) boastfully.
    He cocked his hat jauntily.
  6. (intransitive, dated) To turn (the eye) obliquely and partially close its lid, as an expression of derision or insinuation.
  7. (intransitive, dated) To strut; to swagger; to look big, pert, or menacing.
  8. (transitive, obsolete) To make a nestle-cock of, to pamper or spoil (of children)
Translations
  • French: armer le chien
  • Italian: armare
  • Russian: взводить
Translations
  • Russian: взводиться
Translations Translations
  • French: baiser, faire une partie de jambes en l’air, poutrer, s’envoyer en l’air
Translations Interjection
  1. (slang) Expression of annoyance.
    • 2006, "Vamp", oh cock i should have kept with a toyota! (on newsgroup uk.rec.cars.modifications)
Noun

cock (plural cocks)

  1. (Southern US, where it is now, rare and dated, ; and AAVE, where it is still sometimes used) Vulva, vagina. [since at least the 1920s; less common after the 1960s]
    • circa 1920-1960 Rufus George Perryman (Speckled Red), quoted by Elijah Wald, The Dozens: A History of Rap's Mama:
      Born in the canebrake and you were suckled by a bear,
      Jumped right through your mammy's cock and never touched a hair.
    • 1933(–35?), Lucille Bogan, Till the cows come home:
      I told him I gotta good cock / and it's got four damn good names:
      Rough top, / rough cock, / tough cock, / cock without a bone.
      […] If you suck my pussy, / baby, I'll suck your dick.
    • 1949 March 2, Mrs. H. K. of Camden, Missouri, quoted by Vance Randolph, Unprintable Ozark Folksongs and Folklore: Roll me in your arms, Volume 1:
      I've got a girl in Castle Rock,
      She wears a moustache on her cock.
    • 1998, Scarface, Fuck Faces (song):
      I stuck my fist up in her cock, she didn't budge or move it.
    • 2010, Vildred C. Tucker-Dawson, A Journey Back in Time: My Story Book:
      She smelled like she was on her period and hadn't changed pads. On ah many occasions I heard men say her cock smelled through her clothing.
Noun

cock (plural cocks)

  1. A small conical pile of hay.
    The farmhands stack the hay into cocks
Translations
  • Russian: копна́
Verb

cock (cocks, present participle cocking; past and past participle cocked)

  1. (transitive) To form into piles.
    • 1579, Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender
      Under the cocked hay.
Noun

cock (plural cocks)

  1. Abbreviation of cock-boat, a type of small boat.
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene vi]:
      Yond tall anchoring bark [appears] / Diminished to her cock; her cock, a buoy / Almost too small for sight.
Proper noun
  1. (obsolete) A corruption of the word God, used in oaths.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, “The Merry VViues of VVindsor”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene i]:
      By cock and pie.

Cock
Proper noun
  1. Surname



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