dock
Pronunciation Noun

dock

  1. Any of the genus Rumex of coarse weedy plants with small green flowers related to buckwheat, especially common dock, and used as potherbs and in folk medicine, especially in curing nettle rash.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. […], London: Printed [by John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938 ↗, book II, canto IX:
      And vnder neath him his courageous steed, / The fierce Spumador trode them downe like docks {{...}
  2. A burdock plant, or the leaves of that plant.
Translations
  • Italian: romice, lapazio
  • Portuguese: azeda, labaça
  • Russian: ща́ве́ль
Translations
  • Russian: лопу́х
Noun

dock (plural docks)

  1. The fleshy root of an animal's tail.
  2. The part of the tail which remains after the tail has been docked.
  3. (obsolete) The buttocks or anus.
    • 1665, Charles Cotton, Scarronnides:
      And on a Cuſhion ſtuffed with Flocks, / She clapt her dainty pair of Docks.
  4. A leather case to cover the clipped or cut tail of a horse.
Translations
  • Russian: ре́пица
Verb

dock (docks, present participle docking; past and past participle docked)

  1. (transitive) To cut off a section of an animal's tail, to practise a caudectomy.
  2. (transitive) To reduce (wages); to deduct from.
  3. (transitive) To cut off, bar, or destroy.
    to dock an entail
Translations
  • Russian: уреза́ть
Translations
  • German: kupieren
  • Portuguese: derrabar
  • Russian: подреза́ть
  • Spanish: descolar, desrabar, desrabotar
Noun

dock (plural docks)

  1. A fixed structure attached to shore to which a vessel is secured when in port.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314 ↗, page 0025 ↗:
      quote en
  2. A structure attached to shore for loading and unloading vessels.
  3. The body of water between two piers.
  4. The place of arrival and departure of a train in a railway station.
  5. A section of a hotel or restaurant.
    coffee dock
  6. (electronics) A device designed as a base for holding a connected portable appliance such as a laptop computer (in this case, referred to as a docking station), or a mobile telephone, for providing the necessary electrical charge for its autonomy, or as a hardware extension for additional capabilities.
  7. (computing, graphical user interface) A toolbar that provides the user with a way of launching applications, and switching between running applications.
  8. An act of docking; joining two things together.
Synonyms
  • (body of water between piers) slip
  • (structure for loading and unloading vessels) wharf, quay
Translations Translations Translations
  • French: socle
  • Russian: док
Translations
  • Russian: пане́ль зада́ч
Translations Verb

dock (docks, present participle docking; past and past participle docked)

  1. (intransitive) To land at a harbour.
    • 29 February 2012, Aidan Foster-Carter, BBC News North Korea: The denuclearisation dance resumes
      On 28 February, for example, a US Navy ship docked in Nampo, the port for Pyongyang, with equipment for joint searches for remains of US soldiers missing from the 1950-1953 Korean War. China may look askance at the US and North Korean militaries working together like this.
  2. To join two moving items.
  3. (transitive, computing) To drag a user interface element (such as a toolbar) to a position on screen where it snaps into place.
  4. (transitive) To place (an electronic device) in its dock.
    I docked the laptop and allowed it to recharge for an hour.
Translations Translations
  • Russian: стыкова́ть
Noun

dock (plural docks)

  1. Part of a courtroom where the accused sits.
Related terms Translations
  • Russian: скамья́ подсуди́мых
  • Spanish: banquillo
Verb

dock (docks, present participle docking; past and past participle docked)

  1. (cooking) To pierce with holes, as pricking pastry or dough with a fork to prevent excessive rising in the oven.
    • 11 July 2008, Emma Christensen, The Kitchn: How and When to Dock a Pie Crust ↗
      Pricking holes in the rolled-out pie dough allows the steam to escape while it's baking. Without this, the steam would puff up in bubbles and pockets throughout the crust, which would make some parts of the crust cook too quickly and also result in an uneven surface for your filling. Docking is simple. Just roll out your pie dough and lift it into the pan. After pressing it in and shaping the edge, prick it all over with a fork.

Dock
Proper noun
  1. (US, rare, dated) A male given name or nickname.



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