charge
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /t͡ʃɑːd͡ʒ/
  • (America) IPA: /t͡ʃɑɹd͡ʒ/
Noun

charge

  1. The amount of money levied for a service.
    There will be a charge of five dollars.
  2. (military) A ground attack against a prepared enemy.
    Pickett did not die leading his famous charge.
  3. A forceful forward movement.
  4. An accusation.
    Synonyms: count
    • 2005, Lesley Brown (translator), Plato, Sophist. 261a.
      quote en
    That's a slanderous charge of abuse of trust.
  5. (physics and chemistry) An electric charge.
  6. The scope of someone's responsibility.
    The child was in the nanny's charge.
    • 1848 April 24, John K. Kane, opinion, United States v. Hutchison, as reported in The Pennsylvania law Journal, June 1848 edition, as reprinted in, 1848,The Pennsylvania Law Journal volume 7, page 366 :
      quote en
  7. Someone or something entrusted to one's care, such as a child to a babysitter or a student to a teacher.
    The child was a charge of the nanny.
  8. A load or burden; cargo.
    The ship had a charge of colonists and their belongings.
  9. An instruction.
    I gave him the charge to get the deal closed by the end of the month.
  10. (basketball) An offensive foul in which the player with the ball moves into a stationary defender.
  11. A measured amount of powder and/or shot in a firearm cartridge.
  12. (heraldry) An image displayed on an escutcheon.
  13. (weaponry) A position (of a weapon) fitted for attack.
    to bring a weapon to the charge
  14. (farriery) A sort of plaster or ointment.
  15. (obsolete) Weight; import; value.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene ii]:
      many suchlike as's of great charge
  16. (historical or obsolete) A measure of thirty-six pigs of lead, each pig weighing about seventy pounds; a charre.
  17. (ecclesiastical) An address given at a church service concluding a visitation.
Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • French: charge
  • German: Ladung
  • Italian: carica
  • Portuguese: carga (elétrica)
  • Russian: заря́д
Translations
  • Russian: отве́тственность
Translations
  • Russian: отве́тственный
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Verb

charge (charges, present participle charging; past and past participle charged)

  1. to assign a duty or responsibility to
    • Bible, Joshua xxii. 5:
      Moses […] charged you to love the Lord your God.
    • 1613, William Shakespeare; [John Fletcher], “The Famous History of the Life of King Henry the Eight”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene ii]:
      Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition.
  2. (transitive) to assign (a debit) to an account
    Let's charge this to marketing.
  3. (transitive) to pay on account, as by using a credit card
    Can I charge my purchase to my credit card?
    Can I charge this purchase?
  4. (ambitransitive) to require payment (of) (a price or fee, for goods, services, etc.)
    to charge high for goods
    I won't charge you for the wheat
  5. (possibly archaic) to sell at a given price.
    to charge coal at $5 per unit
  6. (law) to formally accuse (a person) of a crime.
    I'm charging you with assault and battery.
  7. to impute or ascribe
    • No more accuse thy pen, but charge the crime / On native sloth, and negligence of time.
  8. to call to account; to challenge
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, “The Life and Death of King Iohn”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene i]:
      to charge me to an answer
  9. (transitive) to place a burden or load on or in
    • 1693, [John Locke], “§64”, in Some Thoughts Concerning Education, London: […] A[wnsham] and J[ohn] Churchill, […], OCLC 1161614482 ↗:
      the charging of children's memories […] with rules
    • 1911, The Encyclopedia Britannica, entry on Moya:
      [A] huge torrent of boiling black mud, charged with blocks of rock and moving with enormous rapidity, rolled like an avalanche down the gorge.
    1. to ornament with or cause to bear
      to charge an architectural member with a moulding
    2. (heraldry) to assume as a bearing
      He charges three roses.
    3. (heraldry) to add to or represent on
      He charges his shield with three roses or.
  10. (transitive) to load equipment with material required for its use, as a firearm with powder, a fire hose with water, a chemical reactor with raw materials
    Charge your weapons; we're moving up.
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, “The Life and Death of King Iohn”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene i]:
      their battering cannon charged to the mouths
    1. (transitive) to cause to take on an electric charge
      Rubbing amber with wool will charge it quickly.
    2. (transitive) to add energy to (a battery, or a device containing a battery).
      He charged the battery overnight.
      Don't forget to charge the drill.
      I charge my phone every night.
    3. (intransitive, of a battery or a device containing a battery) to gain energy
      The battery is still charging: I can't use it yet.
      His cell phone charges very quickly, whereas mine takes forever.
  11. (intransitive) to move forward quickly and forcefully, particularly in combat and/or on horseback
    1. (military, transitive and intransitive) to attack by moving forward quickly in a group
      The impetuous corps charged the enemy lines.
    2. (basketball) to commit a charging foul
    3. (cricket, of a, batsman) to take a few steps down the pitch towards the bowler as he delivers the ball, either to disrupt the length of the delivery, or to get into a better position to hit the ball
  12. (transitive, of a, hunting dog) to lie on the belly and be still (A command given by a hunter to a dog)
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