fashion
Pronunciation
  • IPA: /ˈfæʃən/

Noun

fashion

  1. (countable) A current (constantly changing) trend, favored for frivolous rather than practical, logical, or intellectual reasons.
  2. (uncountable) Popular trends.
    Check out the latest in fashion.
    • 1693, [John Locke], “§208”, in Some Thoughts Concerning Education, London: […] A[wnsham] and J[ohn] Churchill, […], OCLC 1161614482 ↗:
      the innocent diversions in fashion
    • 1879, Herbert Spencer, Principles of Sociology Part IV
      As now existing, fashion is a form of social regulation analogous to constitutional government as a form of political regulation.
  3. (countable) A style or manner in which something is done.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter V
      When it had advanced from the wood, it hopped much after the fashion of a kangaroo, using its hind feet and tail to propel it, and when it stood erect, it sat upon its tail.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene ii]:
      OPHELIA - My lord, he hath importuned me with love in honourable fashion. LORD POLONIUS - Ay, fashion you may call it; go to, go to.
  4. The make or form of anything; the style, shape, appearance, or mode of structure; pattern, model; workmanship; execution.
    the fashion of the ark, of a coat, of a house, of an altar, etc.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Luke 9:29 ↗:
      The fashion of his countenance was altered.
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene vi]:
      I do not like the fashion of your garments.
  5. (dated) Polite, fashionable, or genteel life; social position; good breeding.
    men of fashion
Translations Translations Translations
Verb

fashion (fashions, present participle fashioning; past and past participle fashioned)

  1. To make, build or construct, especially in a crude or improvised way.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter IX
      I have three gourds which I fill with water and take back to my cave against the long nights. I have fashioned a spear and a bow and arrow, that I may conserve my ammunition, which is running low.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist, translation by Lesley Brown, 235b:
      […] a device fashioned by arguments against that kind of prey.
  2. (dated) To make in a standard manner; to work.
    • 1691, John Locke, Some Considerations of the Consequences of the Lowering of Interest and the Raising the Value of Money
      Fashioned plate sells for more than its weight.
  3. (dated) To fit, adapt, or accommodate to.
    • Laws ought to be fashioned to the manners and conditions of the people.
  4. (obsolete) To forge or counterfeit.
    • c. 1603–1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of King Lear”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene ii]:
      Let me, if not by birth, have lands by wit; All with me's meet that I can fashion feet.
Translations


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