quality
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /ˈkwɒlɪti/
  • (British, obsolete) IPA: /ˈkwælɪti/, /ˈkwælɪtɪ/
  • (America, father-bother, weak vowel) IPA: /ˈkwɑləti/, [ˈkʰwɑɫəɾi]

Noun

quality

  1. (uncountable) Level of excellence.
    This school is well-known for having teachers of high quality.
    Quality of life is usually determined by health, education, and income.
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, chapter I, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, OCLC 1227855 ↗:
      “I'll tell you what you're going to do. Have you a clean shirt?” “Several.” “And a toothbrush?” “Two, both of the finest quality.” “Then pack them. You're coming to Brinkley tomorrow.”
    • 2019, [https://web.archive.org/web/20190311070055/https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/south-korea-proposes-rain-project-with-china-to-cut-pollution/4819207.html VOA Learning English] (public domain)
      He called for China’s cooperation in efforts to improve air quality.
  2. (countable) A property or an attribute that differentiates a thing or person.
    One of the qualities of pure iron is that it does not rust easily.
    While being impulsive can be great for artists, it is not a desirable quality for engineers.
    Security, stability, and efficiency are good qualities of an operating system.
    • 1601, Ben Jonson, Poetaster or The Arraignment: […], London: Printed [by R. Bradock] for M[atthew] L[ownes] […], published 1602, OCLC 316392309 ↗, Act III, scene iv ↗:
      Tuc[ca]. […] Can thy Author doe it impudently enough? / Hiſt[rio]. O, I warrant you, Captaine: and ſpitefully inough too; he ha's one of the moſt ouerflowing villanous wits, in Rome. He will ſlander any man that breathes; If he diſguſt him. / Tucca. I'le know the poor, egregious, nitty Raſcall; and he haue ſuch commendable Qualities, I'le cheriſh him: {{...}
    • 1960, P[elham] G[renville] Wodehouse, chapter XX, in Jeeves in the Offing, London: Herbert Jenkins, OCLC 1227855 ↗:
      “That's life,” she said, and buzzed off to keep her vigil, leaving me kicking myself because I'd forgotten to say anything about the quality of mercy not being strained. It isn't, as I dare say you know, and a mention of this might just have done the trick.
  3. (archaic) High social position. (See also the quality.)
    A peasant is not allowed to fall in love with a lady of quality.
    Membership of this golf club is limited to those of quality and wealth.
  4. (uncountable) The degree to which a man-made object or system is free from bugs and flaws, as opposed to scope of functions or quantity of items.
  5. (thermodynamics) In a two-phase liquidvapor mixture, the ratio of the mass of vapor present to the total mass of the mixture.
  6. (emergency medicine, countable) The third step in OPQRST where the responder investigates what the NOI/MOI feels like.
    To identify quality try asking, "what does it feel like?".
  7. (countable, UK, journalism) A newspaper with relatively serious, high-quality content.
    • 1998, Bill Coxall, ‎Lynton Robins, ‎Robert Leach, Contemporary British Politics (page 164)
      It is argued that in the last ten years or so, quality broadsheet newspapers have become more like the tabloids. Anthony Sampson has argued that 'the frontier between the qualities and popular papers has virtually disappeared'.
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations
  • Italian: qualità
  • Portuguese: alta classe
  • Russian: зна́тность
Translations
  • Portuguese: qualidade
  • Russian: надёжность

Adjective

quality

  1. Being of good worth, well made, fit for purpose.
    We only sell quality products.
    That was a quality game by Jim Smith.
    A quality system ensures products meet customer requirements.
Related terms Translations


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