digest
Pronunciation
  • enPR dī-jĕstʹ, IPA: /daɪˈdʒɛst/, /dəˈdʒɛst/
Verb

digest (digests, present participle digesting; past and past participle digested)

  1. (transitive) To distribute or arrange methodically; to work over and classify; to reduce to portions for ready use or application.
    to digest laws
    • joining them together and digesting them into order
    • c. 1606–1607, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene ii]:
      We have cause to be glad that matters are so well digested.
  2. (transitive) To separate (the food) in its passage through the alimentary canal into the nutritive and nonnutritive elements; to prepare, by the action of the digestive juices, for conversion into blood; to convert into chyme.
  3. (transitive) To think over and arrange methodically in the mind; to reduce to a plan or method; to receive in the mind and consider carefully; to get an understanding of; to comprehend.
    • Feelingly digest the words you speak in prayer.
    • c. 1608–1609, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedy of Coriolanus”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene i]:
      How shall this bosom multiplied digest / The senate's courtesy?
    • , Book of Common Prayer
      Grant that we may in such wise hear them [the Scriptures], read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them.
  4. To bear comfortably or patiently; to be reconciled to; to brook.
    • I never can digest the loss of most of Origen's works.
  5. (transitive, chemistry) To expose to a gentle heat in a boiler or matrass, as a preparation for chemical operations.
  6. (intransitive) To undergo digestion.
    I just ate an omelette and I'm waiting for it to digest.
  7. (medicine, obsolete, intransitive) To suppurate; to generate pus, as an ulcer.
  8. (medicine, obsolete, transitive) To cause to suppurate, or generate pus, as an ulcer or wound.
  9. (obsolete, transitive) To ripen; to mature.
    • well-digested fruits
  10. (obsolete, transitive) To quieten or reduce (a negative feeling, such as anger or grief)
Synonyms
  • (distribute or arrange methodically) arrange, sort, sort out
  • (separate food in the alimentary canal)
  • (think over and arrange methodically in the mind) sort out
  • (chemistry)
  • (undergo digestion)
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • German: verdaulich sein
Pronunciation
  • enPR dīʹjĕst, IPA: /ˈdaɪdʒɛst/, /ˈdaɪdʒəst/
Noun

digest (plural digests)

  1. That which is digested; especially, that which is worked over, classified, and arranged under proper heads or titles
  2. A compilation of statutes or decisions analytically arranged; a summary of laws.
    Comyn's Digest
    the United States Digest
  3. Any collection of articles, as an Internet mailing list including a week's postings, or a magazine arranging a collection of writings.
    Reader's Digest is published monthly.
    The weekly email digest contains all the messages exchanged during the past week.
  4. (cryptography) The result of applying a hash function to a message.
Translations Translations Translations Translations


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