divine
Pronunciation
  • enPR: dĭ-vīnʹ, IPA: /dɪˈvaɪn/
Adjective

divine

  1. Of or pertaining to a god.
  2. Eternal, holy, or otherwise godlike.
  3. Of superhuman or surpassing excellence.
  4. Beautiful, heavenly.
  5. (obsolete) Foreboding; prescient.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 8”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      Yet oft his heart, divine of something ill, / Misgave him.
  6. (obsolete, of souls) immortal; elect or saved after death
    • 1595 December 9 (first known performance)​, William Shakespeare, “The life and death of King Richard the Second”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene i], page 23 ↗, column 1:
      Now Thomas Mowbray do I turne to thee,
      And marke my greeting well: for what I ſpeake,
      My body ſhall make good vpon this earth,
      Or my diuine ſoule anſwer it in heauen.
    • 1632, Thomas Heywood, The Iron Age, Part 2:
      (Of that at leaſure) but the bloody ſtage
      On which to act, Generall this night is thine,
      Thou lyeſt downe mortall, who muſt riſe diuine.
  7. Relating to divinity or theology.
    • church history and other divine learning
Synonyms Antonyms Translations Translations Translations Translations Noun

divine (plural divines)

  1. One skilled in divinity; a theologian.
    • Poets were the first divines.
  2. A minister of the gospel; a priest; a clergyman.
    • The first divines of New England were surpassed by none in extensive erudition.
  3. (often capitalized, with 'the') God or a god, particularly in its aspect as a transcendental concept.
Synonyms Translations Verb

divine (divines, present participle divining; past and past participle divined)

  1. (transitive) To foretell (something), especially by the use of divination.
    • a sagacity which divined the evil designs
    • 1595 December 9 (first known performance)​, William Shakespeare, “The life and death of King Richard the Second”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene iv]:
      Darest thou […] divine his downfall?
  2. (transitive) To guess or discover (something) through intuition or insight.
    • 1874, James Thomson, The City of Dreadful Night
      no secret can be told
      To any who divined it not before
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 43
      If in the loneliness of his studio he wrestled desperately with the Angel of the Lord he never allowed a soul to divine his anguish.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 250c.
      I suppose that we truly are divining that what is is some third thing when we say that change and stability are.
  3. (transitive) To search for (underground objects or water) using a divining rod.
  4. To render divine; to deify.
    • Living on earth like angel new divined.
Related terms Translations Translations Related terms
  • a lo divino
  • baculus divinatorius
  • divinistre
  • Divinópolis
  • Divinópolis de Goiás
  • La Divina
  • lectio divina
  • Liposcelis divinatorius
  • Salvia divinorum
  • São José do Divino
  • virgula divina
  • voce divinare

Divine
Proper noun
  1. Surname



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