everlasting
Pronunciation
  • (GA) IPA: /ˌɛvɚˈlæstɪŋ/
  • (RP) IPA: /ˌɛvəˈlɑːstɪŋ/
Adjective

everlasting

  1. Lasting or enduring forever; existing or continuing without end
    Synonyms: immortal, eternal
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Genesis 21:33 ↗:
      The Everlasting God.
  2. Continuing indefinitely, or during a long period; perpetual; sometimes used, colloquially, as a strong intensive.
    this everlasting nonsense
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Genesis 17:8 ↗:
      I will give to thee, and to thy seed after thee […] the land of Canaan, for an everlasting possession.
    • 1728, [Alexander Pope], “(please specify )”, in The Dunciad. An Heroic Poem. In Three Books, Dublin; London: Reprinted for A. Dodd, OCLC 1033416756 ↗:
      {quote-meta/quote
  3. (philosophy) Existing with infinite temporal duration (as opposed to existence outside of time).
Synonyms Antonyms Translations Translations Adverb

everlasting

  1. (colloquial) Extremely.
Noun

everlasting (plural everlastings)

  1. An everlasting flower.
    • 1942, Emily Carr, The Book of Small, “The Orange Lily,”
      With a backward look Small said, “What a lovely lily!” ¶ “Well enough but strong-smelling, gaudy. Come see the everlastings.”
    • 1974, GB Edwards, The Book of Ebenezer Le Page, New York 2007, p. 313:
      ‘It is true perhaps it is too late now for you to look like a rose; but you can always look like an everlasting.’
  2. (historical) A durable cloth fabric for shoes, etc.



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