parallel
Pronunciation
  • enPR: păr'ə-lĕl", IPA: /ˈpæɹəˌlɛl/
  • (Mary-marry-merry) enPR: per'ə-lĕl", IPA: /ˈpɛɹəˌlɛl/

Adjective

parallel (not comparable)

  1. Equally distant from one another at all points.
    The horizontal lines on my notebook paper are parallel.
    • 1911, William Robert Martin, ''''
      the instrument held with its plane roughly parallel to the equinoctial or celestial equato
  2. Having the same overall direction; the comparison is indicated with "to".
    The two railway lines are parallel.
    • When honour runs parallel with the laws of God and our country, it cannot be too much cherished.
  3. (hyperbolic geometry, said of a pair of lines) Either not intersecting, or coinciding.
  4. (computing) Involving the processing of multiple tasks at the same time.
    a parallel algorithm
Antonyms Translations Translations Translations
  • Portuguese: paralelo
  • Russian: паралле́льный

Adverb

parallel

  1. With a parallel relationship.
    The road runs parallel to the canal.
Related terms Translations
Noun

parallel (plural parallels)

  1. One of a set of parallel lines.
    • 1733, [Alexander Pope], An Essay on Man. […], (please specify ), London: Printed for J[ohn] Wilford, […], OCLC 960856019 ↗:
  2. Direction conformable to that of another line.
    • lines that from their parallel decline
  3. A line of latitude.
    The 31st parallel passes through the center of my town.
  4. An arrangement of electrical components such that a current flows along two or more paths; see in parallel.
  5. Something identical or similar in essential respects.
    • 1728, [Alexander Pope], “Book the Third”, in The Dunciad. An Heroic Poem. In Three Books, Dublin; London: Reprinted for A. Dodd, OCLC 1033416756 ↗:
      None but thyself can be thy parallel.
  6. A comparison made; elaborate tracing of similarity.
    Johnson's parallel between Dryden and Pope
  7. (military) One of a series of long trenches constructed before a besieged fortress, by the besieging force, as a cover for troops supporting the attacking batteries. They are roughly parallel to the line of outer defenses of the fortress.
  8. (printing) A character consisting of two parallel vertical lines, used in the text to direct attention to a similarly marked note in the margin or at the foot of a page.
Antonyms Translations Translations
Verb

parallel (parallels, present participle paralleling; past and past participle paralleled)

  1. To construct or place something parallel to something else.
    • The needle […] doth parallel and place itself upon the true meridian.
  2. Of a path etc: To be parallel to something else.
    • 1931, H. P. Lovecraft, The Whisperer in Darkness, chapter 6:
      Archaic covered bridges lingered fearsomely out of the past in pockets of the hills, and the half-abandoned railway track paralleling the river seemed to exhale a nebulously visible air of desolation.
  3. Of a process etc: To be analogous to something else.
  4. To compare or liken something to something else.
  5. To make to conform to something else in character, motive, aim, etc.
    • c. 1603–1604, William Shakespeare, “Measvre for Measure”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene ii]:
      His life is parallelled / Even with the stroke and line of his great justice.
  6. To equal; to match; to correspond to.
  7. To produce or adduce as a parallel.
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene iii]:
      My young remembrance cannot parallel / A fellow to it.
    • 1621, Robert Burton (scholar), The Anatomy of Melancholy, III.2.2.iv:
      Who cannot parallel these stories out of his experience?



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