sense
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /sɛn(t)s/
  • (GA) enPR: sĕns, IPA: /sɛns/
  • (pen-pin merger) IPA: /sɪn(t)s/

Noun

sense

  1. Any of the manners by which living beings perceive the physical world: for humans sight, smell, hearing, touch, taste.
    • c. 1601–1602, William Shakespeare, “Twelfe Night, or VVhat You VVill”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene i]:
      Let fancy still my sense in Lethe steep.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book V”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      What surmounts the reach / Of human sense I shall delineate.
  2. Perception through the intellect; apprehension; awareness.
    a sense of security
    • this Basilius, having the quick sense of a lover
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book I”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      high disdain from sense of injured merit
  3. Sound practical or moral judgment.
    It's common sense not to put metal objects in a microwave oven.
    • Some are so hardened in wickedness as to have no sense of the most friendly offices.
  4. The meaning, reason, or value of something.
    You don’t make any sense.
    the true sense of words or phrases
    • Bible, Neh. viii. 8
      So they read in the book in the law of God distinctly, and gave the sense.
    • c. 1590–1592, William Shakespeare, “The Taming of the Shrew”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene i]:
      I think 'twas in another sense.
  5. A natural appreciation or ability.
    A keen musical sense
  6. (pragmatics) The way that a referent is presented.
  7. (semantics) A single conventional use of a word; one of the entries for a word in a dictionary.
    The definition of sense in this context, is given in sense 7 of its definition.
  8. (mathematics) One of two opposite directions in which a vector (especially of motion) may point. See also polarity.
  9. (mathematics) One of two opposite directions of rotation, clockwise versus anti-clockwise.
  10. (biochemistry) referring to the strand of a nucleic acid that directly specifies the product.
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • Russian: смысл
Translations Translations
  • Italian: verso
  • Russian: направле́ние
  • Spanish: sentido
Translations
  • Russian: направле́ние
  • Spanish: sentido

Verb

sense (senses, present participle sensing; past and past participle sensed)

  1. To use biological senses: to either smell, watch, taste, hear or feel.
  2. To instinctively be aware.
    She immediately sensed her disdain.
  3. To comprehend.
Translations Translations
  • Portuguese: sentir
  • Russian: чу́вствовать
  • Spanish: sentir
Translations
  • Spanish: dar sentido



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