bell
Pronunciation Noun

bell (plural bells)

  1. A percussive instrument made of metal or other hard material, typically but not always in the shape of an inverted cup with a flared rim, which resonates when struck.
    • 1848, Edgar Allan Poe, "The Bells"
      HEAR the sledges with the bells
      Silver bells!
      What a world of merriment their melody foretells!
  2. The sounding of a bell as a signal.
  3. (chiefly, British, informal) A telephone call.
    I’ll give you a bell later.
  4. A signal at a school that tells the students when a class is starting or ending.
  5. (music) The flared end of a brass or woodwind instrument.
  6. (nautical) Any of a series of strokes on a bell (or similar), struck every half hour to indicate the time (within a four hour watch)
  7. The flared end of a pipe, designed to mate with a narrow spigot.
  8. (computing) A device control code that produces a beep (or rings a small electromechanical bell on older teleprinters etc.).
  9. Anything shaped like a bell, such as the cup or corolla of a flower.
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene i]:
      In a cowslip's bell I lie.
  10. (architecture) The part of the capital of a column included between the abacus and neck molding; also used for the naked core of nearly cylindrical shape, assumed to exist within the leafage of a capital.
  11. An instrument situated on a bicycle's handlebar, used by the cyclist to warn of his or her presence.
Synonyms
  • (in heraldry) campane
  • (rare) tintinnabule
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • French: pavillon
  • Russian: ра́струб
Translations
  • Russian: скля́нка
Translations Verb

bell (bells, present participle belling; past and past participle belled)

  1. (transitive) To attach a bell to.
    Who will bell the cat?
  2. (transitive) To shape so that it flares out like a bell.
    to bell a tube
  3. (slang, transitive) To telephone.
  4. (intransitive) To develop bells or corollas; to take the form of a bell; to blossom.
    Hops bell.
Translations
  • Russian: звони́ть
Verb

bell (bells, present participle belling; past and past participle belled)

  1. (intransitive) To bellow or roar.
    • As the dawn was breaking the Sambhur belled / Once, twice and again!
    • 1872, Robert Browning, Fifine at the Fair ↗:
      You acted part so well, went alɬ-fours upon earth / The live-long day, brayed, belled.
    • 1955, William Golding, The Inheritors, Faber and Faber 2005, page 128:
      Then, incredibly, a rutting stag belled by the trunks.
  2. (transitive) To utter in a loud manner; to thunder forth.
    • 1591, Edmund Spenser, Astrophel:
      Their leaders bell their bleating tunes In doleful sound.
Noun

bell (plural bells)

  1. The bellow or bay of certain animals, such as a hound on the hunt or a stag in rut.

Bell
Pronunciation Proper noun
  1. A Scottish and northern English surname for a bell ringer, bellmaker, or from someone who lived "at the Bell (inn)"
  2. The Bell telephone company (after Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone.)
  3. A male given name.
  4. A female given name; mostly used as a middle name in the 19th century.
    • 1857 Charles Dickens, The Perils of Certain English Prisoners, Chapter 1:
      […] I found that her Christian name was Isabella, which they shortened into Bell, and that the name of the deceased non-commissioned officer was Tott. Being the kind of neat little woman it was natural to make a toy of—I never saw a woman so like a toy in my life—she had got the plaything name of Belltott. In short, she had no other name on the island.
Noun

bell (plural bells)

  1. (US, Canada) a telephone utility; a Baby Bell.



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