premise
Pronunciation
  • enPR: prĕ'mĭs, IPA: /ˈpɹɛ.mɪs/
Noun

premise (plural premises)

  1. A proposition antecedently supposed or proved; something previously stated or assumed as the basis of further argument; a condition; a supposition.
    • c. 1604–1605, William Shakespeare, “All’s VVell, that Ends VVell”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene i]:
      The premises observed, / Thy will by my performance shall be served.
  2. (logic) Any of the first propositions of a syllogism, from which the conclusion is deduced.
    • While the premises stand firm, it is impossible to shake the conclusion.
  3. (usually, in the plural, legal) Matters previously stated or set forth; especially, that part in the beginning of a deed, the office of which is to express the grantor and grantee, and the land or thing granted or conveyed, and all that precedes the habendum; the thing demised or granted.
  4. (usually, in the plural) A piece of real estate; a building and its adjuncts. (This meaning arose from meaning #3, by owners of land and/or buildings finding the word in their title deeds and wrongly guessing its meaning.)
    trespass on another’s premises
  5. (authorship) The fundamental concept that drives the plot of a film or other story.
Translations Translations Translations Translations Related terms Verb

premise (premises, present participle premising; past and past participle premised)

  1. To state or assume something as a proposition to an argument.
  2. To make a premise.
  3. To set forth beforehand, or as introductory to the main subject; to offer previously, as something to explain or aid in understanding what follows.
    • I premise these particulars that the reader may know that I enter upon it as a very ungrateful task.
  4. To send before the time, or beforehand; hence, to cause to be before something else; to employ previously.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Sixt, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene ii]:
      the premised flames of the last day
    • if venesection and a cathartic be premised



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