tide
Pronunciation Noun

tide (plural tides)

  1. The periodic change of the sea level, particularly when caused by the gravitational influence of the sun and the moon.
  2. A stream, current or flood.
    • c. 1605–1608, William Shakespeare, “The Life of Tymon of Athens”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene iv], page 88 ↗, column 1:
      Go I charge thee, inuite them all, let in the tide / Of Knaues once more: my Cook and Ile provide.
  3. (chronology, obsolete, except in liturgy) Time, notably anniversary, period or season linked to an ecclesiastical feast.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. […], London: Printed [by John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938 ↗, book 1, canto II, stanza xxix:
      [...] and rest their weary limbs a tide.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, wsource Prothalamion:
      Which, at th'appointed tyde, / Each one did make his Bryde
  4. (regional, archaic) A time.
    The doctor's no good this tide.
  5. (regional, archaic) A point or period of time identified or described by a qualifier (found in compounds).
    Eventide, noontide, morrowtide, nighttide, moon-tide, harvest-tide, wintertide, summertide, springtide, autumn-tide etc.,.
  6. (mining) The period of twelve hours.
  7. Something which changes like the tides of the sea.
  8. Tendency or direction of causes, influences, or events; course; current.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Ivlivs Cæsar”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene iii]:
      There is a tide in the affairs of men, / Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune [...]
  9. (obsolete) Violent confluence
Translations Translations Translations
  • Russian: вре́мя
Translations Verb

tide (tides, present participle tiding; past and past participle tided)

  1. (transitive) To cause to float with the tide; to drive or carry with the tide or stream.
    • They are tided down the stream.
  2. (intransitive) To pour a tide or flood.
    The ocean tided most impressively.
  3. (intransitive, nautical) To work into or out of a river or harbor by drifting with the tide and anchoring when it becomes adverse.
Verb

tide (tides, present participle tiding; past and past participle tided)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To happen, occur.
Synonyms


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