cope
Pronunciation Verb

cope (copes, present participle coping; past and past participle coped)

  1. (intransitive) To deal effectively with something, especially if difficult.
    I thought I would never be able to cope with life after the amputation, but I have learned how to be happy again.
  2. To cut and form a mitred joint in wood or metal.
  3. (falconry) To clip the beak or talons of a bird.
Synonyms Antonyms Translations Noun

cope (plural copes)

  1. A long, loose cloak worn by a priest, deacon, or bishop when presiding over a ceremony other than the Mass.
    • a hundred and sixty priests all in their copes
    • 1890, Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. XI:
      He possessed a gorgeous cope of crimson silk and gold-thread damask, figured with a repeating pattern of golden pomegranates set in six-petalled formal blossoms, beyond which on either side was the pine-apple device wrought in seed-pearls.
  2. Any covering such as a canopy or a mantle.
  3. (literary) The vault or canopy of the skies, heavens etc.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book 4”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker […] [a]nd by Robert Boulter […] [a]nd Matthias Walker, […], OCLC 228722708 ↗; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: […], London: Basil Montagu Pickering […], 1873, OCLC 230729554 ↗:
      the starry cope of heaven
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 12, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes, […], book II, printed at London: By Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount […], OCLC 946730821 ↗:
      Who perceiveth and seeth himselfe placed here, […] farthest from heavens coape, with those creatures, that are the worst of the three conditions; and yet dareth imaginarily place himselfe above the circle of the Moone, and reduce heaven under his feet.
  4. (construction) A covering piece on top of a wall exposed to the weather, usually made of metal, masonry, or stone, and sloped to carry off water.
  5. (foundry) The top part of a sand casting mold.
  6. An ancient tribute due to the lord of the soil, out of the lead mines in Derbyshire, England.
Translations Translations Translations Verb

cope (copes, present participle coping; past and past participle coped)

  1. (transitive) To cover (a joint or structure) with coping.
  2. (intransitive) To form a cope or arch; to bend or arch; to bow.
    • Some bending down and coping to ward the earth.
Verb

cope (copes, present participle coping; past and past participle coped)

  1. (obsolete) To bargain for; to buy.
  2. (obsolete) To exchange or barter.
  3. (obsolete) To make return for; to requite; to repay.
    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene i]:
      Three thousand ducats due unto the Jew, / We freely cope your courteous pains withal.
  4. (obsolete) To match oneself against; to meet; to encounter.
    • c. 1598–1600, William Shakespeare, “As You Like It”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene i]:
      I love to cope him in these sullen fits.
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Troylus and Cressida”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act I, scene ii]:
      They say he yesterday coped Hector in the battle, and struck him down.
    • Host coped with host, dire was the battle.
  5. (obsolete) To encounter; to meet; to have to do with.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene ii]:
      Horatio, thou art e'en as just a man / As e'er my conversation coped withal.

Cope
Proper noun
  1. Surname



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