anchor
Pronunciation
  • (British) IPA: /ˈæŋ.kə/
  • (America) enPR: ăngʹkər, IPA: /ˈæŋ.kɚ/

Noun

anchor (plural anchors)

  1. (nautical) A tool used to moor a vessel to the bottom of a sea or river to resist movement.
  2. (nautical) An iron device so shaped as to grip the bottom and hold a vessel at her berth by the chain or rope attached. (FM 55-501).
  3. (nautical) The combined anchoring gear (anchor, rode, bill/peak and fittings such as bitts, cat, and windlass.)
  4. (heraldiccharge) Representation of the nautical tool, used as a heraldic charge.
  5. Any instrument serving a purpose like that of a ship's anchor, such as an arrangement of timber to hold a dam fast; a device to hold the end of a bridge cable etc.; or a device used in metalworking to hold the core of a mould in place.
  6. (Internet) A marked point in a document that can be the target of a hyperlink.
  7. (television) An anchorman or anchorwoman.
  8. (athletics) The final runner in a relay race.
  9. (archery) A point that is touched by the draw hand or string when the bow is fully drawn and ready to shoot.
  10. (economics) A superstore or other facility that serves as a focus to bring customers into an area.
    Synonyms: anchor tenant
    • 2006, Planning: For the Natural and Built Environment (issues 1650-1666, page 15)
      Supermarkets have also had to adjust. Tesco, Sainsbury's and Asda have put a much greater emphasis on developing smaller high street stores or becoming anchors for mixed-used regeneration schemes […]
    • 2007, A. Sivakumar, Retail Marketing (page 102)
      However, mall developers offer huge discounts to department stores because these anchors create traffic […]
  11. (figurative) That which gives stability or security.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Hebrew 6:19 ↗:
      which hope we have as an anchor of the soul
  12. (architecture) A metal tie holding adjoining parts of a building together.
  13. (architecture) Carved work, somewhat resembling an anchor or arrowhead; part of the ornaments of certain mouldings. It is seen in the echinus, or egg-and-anchor (called also egg-and-dart, egg-and-tongue) ornament.
  14. One of the anchor-shaped spicules of certain sponges.
  15. One of the calcareous spinules of certain holothurians, as in species of Synapta.
  16. (cartomancy) The thirty-fifth Lenormand card.
  17. (obsolete) An anchorite or anchoress.
    • c. 1599–1602, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals):
      Nor earth to me give food, nor heaven light, / Sport and repose lock from me day and night, / To desperation turn my trust and hope, / An anchor's cheer in prison be my scope.
Translations Translations
  • German: Verankerung, Magnet (figurative)
Translations Translations
  • German: TV-Moderator, TV-Moderatorin, Moderator, Moderatorin, TV-Chefsprecher, TV-Chefsprecherin, Chefsprecher, Chefsprecherin, Anchorman, Anchorwoman
  • Portuguese: âncora
  • Russian: веду́щий

Verb

anchor (anchors, present participle anchoring; past and past participle anchored)

  1. To connect an object, especially a ship or a boat, to a fixed point.
  2. To cast anchor; to come to anchor.
    Our ship (or the captain) anchored in the stream.
  3. To stop; to fix or rest.
    • c. 1603–1604, William Shakespeare, “Measvre for Measure”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene ii]:
      My invention […] anchors on Isabel.
  4. To provide emotional stability for a person in distress.
  5. To perform as an anchorman or anchorwoman.
  6. To be stuck; to be unable to move away from a position.
Synonyms Translations Translations
Anchor
Proper noun
  1. A male given name.



This text is extracted from the Wiktionary and it is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license | Terms and conditions | Privacy policy 0.005
Offline English dictionary