dub
Pronunciation Verb

dub (dubs, present participle dubbing; past and past participle dubbed)

  1. (transitive) (now historical) To confer knighthood; the conclusion of the ceremony was marked by a tap on the shoulder with a sword.
  2. (transitive) To name, to entitle, to call. [from the later 16th c]
    • 1907, Robert William Chambers, chapter V, in The Younger Set, New York, N.Y.: D. Appleton & Company, OCLC 24962326 ↗:
      As a matter of fact its narrow ornate façade presented not a single quiet space that the eyes might rest on after a tiring attempt to follow and codify the arabesques, foliations, and intricate vermiculations of what some disrespectfully dubbed as “near-aissance.”
  3. (transitive) To deem.
    • 1733-1738, Alexander Pope, Imitations of Horace
      A man of wealth is dubbed a man of worth.
  4. To clothe or invest; to ornament; to adorn.
    • , Morte d'Arthure
      His diadem was dropped down / Dubbed with stones.
  5. (heading) To strike, rub, or dress smooth; to dab.
    1. To dress with an adze.
      to dub a stick of timber smooth
    2. To strike cloth with teasels to raise a nap.
    3. To rub or dress with grease, as leather in the process of currying it.
    4. To dress a fishing fly.
  6. To prepare (a gamecock) for fighting, by trimming the hackles and cutting off the comb and wattles.
Synonyms Translations
  • French: adouber
  • German: zum Ritter schlagen
  • Italian: insignire
  • Russian: посвяща́ть в рыцарь
Translations 1505-1515 etystub en Verb

dub (dubs, present participle dubbing; past and past participle dubbed)

  1. To make a noise by brisk drumbeats.
    • 1616–1619 (first performance), John Fletcher, “The Mad Lover”, in Comedies and Tragedies […], London: Printed for Humphrey Robinson, […], and for Humphrey Moseley […], published 1647, OCLC 3083972 ↗, Act 1, scene 1:
      Now the drum dubb's.
  2. To do something badly.
  3. In golf, to execute a shot poorly.
Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (rare) A blow, thrust, or poke.
1885-90; Imitative, see also flub, flubdub Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (now historical) (slang) An unskillful, awkward person. [from the later part of the 19th c]
    • 1969, Robert L. Vann, The Competitor (volumes 2-3, page 135)
      The miser, a-seeking lost gelt, / The doughboy, awaiting the battle, / May possibly know how I felt / While the long years dragged by as the dealer / As slow as the slowest of dubs, / Stuck out the last helping of tickets / 'Till I lifted—the Bullet of Clubs!
Verb

dub (dubs, present participle dubbing; past and past participle dubbed)

  1. To add sound to film or change audio on film. [from the first half of the 20th c]
  2. To make a copy from an original or master audio tape.
  3. To replace the original soundtrack of a film with a synchronized translation
  4. To mix audio tracks to produce a new sound; to remix.
Translations
  • Italian: doppiare
  • Russian: дубли́ровать
Translations
  • Russian: дубли́ровать
Translations Translations Noun

dub

  1. (music, countable) A mostly instrumental remix with all or part of the vocals removed.
  2. (music, uncountable) A style of reggae music involving mixing of different audio tracks.
  3. (music, uncountable) A trend in music starting in 2009, in which bass distortion is synced off timing to electronic dance music.
  4. (slang, countable) A piece of graffiti in metallic colour with a thick black outline.
  5. (countable) The replacement of a voice part in a movie or cartoon, particularly with a translation; an instance of dubbing.
Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (UK, dialect) A pool or puddle.
Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (slang) A twenty dollar sack of marijuana.
  2. (slang) A wheel rim measuring 20 inches or more.
Verb

dub (dubs, present participle dubbing; past and past participle dubbed)

  1. (obsolete, UK, thieves) To open or close.
Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (obsolete, UK, thieves) A lock.
  2. (obsolete, UK, thieves) A key, especially a master key; a lockpick.

DUB
Noun

dub (uncountable)

  1. (medicine) Initialism of dysfunctional uterine bleeding

Dub
Noun

dub (plural dubs)

  1. (Ireland, slang) A Dubliner.
    • 1993, Mary P. Corcoran, Irish Illegals: Transients Between Two Societies (page 138)
      There is a distinction between Dubliners on the one hand and "rednecks" on the other. […] The Dubs historically went to Liverpool and Birmingham, so they don't have the connections.
    • 1994, Patrick O'Dea, A Class of Our Own: Conversations About Class in Ireland (page 51)
      I did the Pat Kenny show one night and talked about coming from the bottom up, and I got numerous letters, saying to hear somebody with a Dub accent running the brewery was unbelievable.
Proper noun
  1. (after a qualification) University of Dublin, used especially following post-nominal letters indicating status as a graduate.



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