drill
Pronunciation
  • enPR: drĭl, IPA: /dɹɪl/, [dɹɪɫ]
Verb

drill (drills, present participle drilling; past and past participle drilled)

  1. (transitive) To create (a hole) by removing material with a drill#Noun|drill tool.
    Synonyms: excavate, bore, gouge, Thesaurus:make hole
    Drill a small hole to start the screw in the right direction.
  2. (intransitive) To practice, especially in (or as in) a military context.
    They drilled daily to learn the routine exactly.
  3. (ergative) To cause to drill practice; to train in military arts.
    The sergeant was up by 6:00 every morning, drilling his troops.
    • 1859, Thomas Macaulay, Life of Frederick the Great
      He [Frederic the Great] drilled his people, as he drilled his grenadiers.
  4. (transitive) To repeat an idea frequently in order to encourage someone to remember it.
    The instructor drilled into us the importance of reading the instructions.
  5. (intransitive) To investigate or examine something in more detail or at a different level
    Drill deeper and you may find the underlying assumptions faulty.
  6. (transitive) To hit or kick with a lot of power.
  7. (baseball) To hit someone with a pitch, especially in an intentional context.
  8. (slang, vulgar) To have sexual intercourse with; to penetrate.
    Synonyms: plow, poke, root, shaft, Thesaurus:copulate with
    • 2010, MasseMord, Masshealing Masskilling
      Everytime when I rape your daughter. Your beautiful faces expressing how it hurts. Always while I drill her c*nt. I want to see you dead.
    • 2012, SwizZz, Flu Shot
      Guess I'll be drilling her butt
  9. (transitive) To cause to flow in drills or rills or by trickling; to drain by trickling.
    waters drilled through a sandy stratum
  10. (transitive) To sow (seeds) by dribbling them along a furrow or in a row.
  11. (transitive, obsolete) To entice or allure; to decoy; with on.
    Synonyms: entice, lead on, lure
  12. (transitive, obsolete) To cause to slip or waste away by degrees.
    • August 28, 1731, letter by Jonathan Swift to John Gay and Catherine Douglas, Duchess of Queensberry
      This cursed accident hath drilled away the whole summer.
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Noun

drill (plural drills)

  1. A tool used to remove material so as to create a hole, typically by plunging a rotating cutting bit into a stationary workpiece.
    Wear safety glasses when operating an electric drill.
  2. The portion of a drilling tool that drives the bit.
    Use a drill with a wire brush to remove any rust or buildup.
  3. An agricultural implement for making holes for sowing seed, and sometimes so formed as to contain seeds and drop them into the hole made.
  4. A light furrow or channel made to put seed into, when sowing.
  5. A row of seed sown in a furrow.
  6. An activity done as an exercise or practice (especially a military exercise), particularly in preparation for some possible future event or occurrence.
    Regular fire drills can ensure that everyone knows how to exit safely in an emergency.
  7. (obsolete) A small trickling stream; a rill.
    • Springs through the pleasant meadows pour their drills.
  8. Any of several molluscs, of the genus Urosalpinx, especially the oyster drill (Urosalpinx cinerea), that drill holes in the shells of other animals.
  9. (uncountable, music) A style of trap music with gritty, violent lyrics, originating on the South Side of Chicago.
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations Related terms Noun

drill (plural drills)

  1. An Old World monkey of West Africa, Mandrillus leucophaeus, similar in appearance to the mandrill, but lacking the colorful face.
Translations
  • French: drill
  • Russian: дрил
  • Spanish: dril
Noun

drill

  1. A strong, durable cotton fabric with a strong bias (diagonal) in the weave.
Synonyms Translations
  • French: coutil
  • German: Drillich
  • Russian: тик
  • Spanish: dril



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