figure
Pronunciation
  • (GA) IPA: /ˈfɪɡjɚ/, /ˈfɪɡɚ/
  • (RP) IPA: /ˈfɪɡə/
  • (Canada) IPA: /ˈfɪɡɚ/, /ˈfɪɡjɚ/

Noun

figure (plural figures)

  1. A drawing or diagram conveying information.
  2. The representation of any form, as by drawing, painting, modelling, carving, embroidering, etc.; especially, a representation of the human body.
    a figure in bronze; a figure cut in marble
    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene vii]:
      a coin that bears the figure of an angel
  3. A person or thing representing a certain consciousness.
  4. The appearance or impression made by the conduct or career of a person.
    He cut a sorry figure standing there in the rain.
    • I made some figure there.
    • gentlemen of the best figure in the county
  5. (obsolete) Distinguished appearance; magnificence; conspicuous representation; splendour; show.
    • that he may live in figure and indulgence
  6. A human figure, which dress or corset must fit to; the shape of a human body.
  7. A numeral.
  8. A number, an amount.
  9. A shape.
    • 1626, Francis Bacon, Sylva Sylvarum, Or, A Naturall Historie: In Ten Centuries
      Flowers have all exquisite figures.
  10. A visible pattern as in wood or cloth.
    The muslin was of a pretty figure.
  11. Any complex dance moveDance move.
  12. A figure of speech.
    • 18, Thomas Babington Macaulay, chapter 20, in The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, volume (please specify ), London: Longman, Brown, Green, and Longmans, OCLC 1069526323 ↗:
      {quote-meta/quote
  13. (logic) The form of a syllogism with respect to the relative position of the middle term.
  14. (astrology) A horoscope; the diagram of the aspects of the astrological houses.
  15. (music) Any short succession of notes, either as melody or as a group of chords, which produce a single complete and distinct impression.
  16. (music) A form of melody or accompaniment kept up through a strain or passage; a motif; a florid embellishment.
Related terms Translations Translations
  • French: forme
  • German: Figur
  • Italian: forma fisica
  • Portuguese: figura
  • Russian: фигу́ра
Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • Russian: о́браз

Verb

figure (figures, present participle figuring; past and past participle figured)

  1. (mostly, US) To calculate, to solve a mathematical problem.
  2. (mostly, US) To come to understand.
    I can't figure if he's telling the truth or lying.
  3. To think, to assume, to suppose, to reckon.
  4. (mostly, US, intransitive) To be reasonable.
    It figures that somebody like him would be upset about the situation.
  5. (intransitive) To enter into; to be a part of.
  6. (obsolete) To represent by a figure, as to form or mould; to make an image of, either palpable or ideal; also, to fashion into a determinate form; to shape.
    • If love, alas! be pain I bear, / No thought can figure, and no tongue declare.
  7. To embellish with design; to adorn with figures.
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, “The Life and Death of King Iohn”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene ii]:
      The vaulty top of heaven / Figured quite o'er with burning meteors.
  8. (obsolete) To indicate by numerals.
    • As through a crystal glass the figured hours are seen.
  9. To represent by a metaphor; to signify or symbolize.
    • c. 1596–1599, William Shakespeare, “The Second Part of Henry the Fourth, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act IV, scene i]:
      whose white vestments figure innocence
  10. (obsolete) To prefigure; to foreshow.
    • c. 1591–1592, William Shakespeare, “The Third Part of Henry the Sixt, […]”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene i]:
      In this the heaven figures some event.
  11. (music) To write over or under the bass, as figures or other characters, in order to indicate the accompanying chords.
  12. (music) To embellish.
Translations Translations


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