part
Pronunciation
  • (RP) IPA: /pɑːt/
  • (GA) enPR: pärt, IPA: /pɑɹt/
  • (AU, New Zealand) IPA: /pɐːt/

Noun

part (plural parts)

  1. A portion; a component.
    1. A fraction of a whole.
      Gaul is divided into three parts.
      • 1992, Rudolf M[athias] Schuster, The Hepaticae and Anthocerotae of North America: East of the Hundredth Meridian, volume V, New York, N.Y.: Columbia University Press, →ISBN, page vii:
        Hepaticology, outside the temperate parts of the Northern Hemisphere, still lies deep in the shadow cast by that ultimate "closet taxonomist," Franz Stephani—a ghost whose shadow falls over us all.
    2. A distinct element of something larger.
      The parts of a chainsaw include the chain, engine, and handle.
    3. A group inside a larger group.
    4. Share, especially of a profit.
      I want my part of the bounty.
    5. A unit of relative proportion in a mixture.
      The mixture comprises one part sodium hydroxide and ten parts water.
    6. 3.5 centiliters of one ingredient in a mixed drink.
    7. A section of a document.
      Please turn to Part I, Chapter 2.
    8. A section of land; an area of a country or other territory; region.
      • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. […], London: Printed [by John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938 ↗, book II, canto VI:
        {...}} the Faery knight / Besought that Damzell suffer him depart, / And yield him readie passage to that other part.
    9. (math, dated) A factor.
      3 is a part of 12.
    10. (US) A room in a public building, especially a courtroom.
  2. Duty; responsibility.
    to do one’s part
    1. Position or role (especially in a play).
      We all have a part to play.
    2. (music) The melody played or sung by a particular instrument, voice, or group of instruments or voices, within a polyphonic piece.
      The first violin part in this concerto is very challenging.
    3. Each of two contrasting sides of an argument, debate etc.; "hand".
      • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, John Florio, transl., The Essayes, […], printed at London: By Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount […], OCLC 946730821 ↗:
        , II.15:
        the fruition of life cannot perfectly be pleasing unto us, if we stand in any feare to lose it. A man might nevertheless say on the contrary part, that we embrace and claspe this good so much the harder, and with more affection, as we perceive it to be less sure, and feare it should be taken from us.
      • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Mark 9:40 ↗:
        He that is not against us is on our part.
      • Make whole kingdoms take her brother's part.
  3. (US) The dividing line formed by combing the hair in different directions.
    The part of his hair was slightly to the left.
  4. (Judaism) In the Hebrew lunisolar calendar, a unit of time equivalent to 3⅓ seconds.
  5. A constituent of character or capacity; quality; faculty; talent; usually in the plural with a collective sense.
    • men of considerable parts
  6. 1881, Thomas Babington Macaulay, “[https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica,_Ninth_Edition/Johnson,_Samuel Samuel Johnson]”, in Encyclopædia Britannica, Ninth Edition:
    great quickness of parts
    • 1598–1599 (first performance), William Shakespeare, “Much Adoe about Nothing”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene ii]:
      which maintained so politic a state of evil, that they will not admit any good part to intermingle with them.
Synonyms Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • Spanish: pago (usually in plural)
Translations Translations
Verb

part (parts, present participle parting; past and past participle parted)

  1. (intransitive) To leave the company of.
    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene vii]:
      He wrung Bassanio's hand, and so they parted.
    • It was strange to him that a father should feel no tenderness at parting with an only son.
    • There is an hour when I must part / From all I hold most dear
    • his precious bag, which he would by no means part from
  2. To cut hair with a parting; shed.
  3. (transitive) To divide in two.
    to part the curtains
    • 1884, Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Chapter VII
      I run the canoe into a deep dent in the bank that I knowed about; I had to part the willow branches to get in; and when I made fast nobody could a seen the canoe from the outside.
  4. (intransitive) To be divided in two or separated; shed.
    A rope parts.  His hair parts in the middle.
  5. (transitive, now, rare) To divide up; to share.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Gospel of Luke III:
      He that hath ij. cootes, lett hym parte with hym that hath none: And he that hath meate, let him do lyke wyse.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, John 19:24 ↗:
      They parted my raiment among them.
    • 1703, Alexander Pope, transl., “The Thebais of Statius”, in The Works of Alexander Pope, London: H. Lintont et al., published 1751:
      to part his throne, and share his heaven with thee
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Qveene. […], London: Printed [by John Wolfe] for VVilliam Ponsonbie, OCLC 960102938 ↗, book II, canto X:
      He left three sonnes, his famous progeny, / Borne of faire Inogene of Italy; / Mongst whom he parted his imperiall state {{...}
  6. (obsolete) To have a part or share; to partake.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, 1 Samuel 30:24 ↗:
      They shall part alike.
  7. To separate or disunite; to remove from contact or contiguity; to sunder.
    • 1611, The Holy Bible, […] (King James Version), imprinted at London: By Robert Barker, […], OCLC 964384981 ↗, Luke 24:51 ↗:
      While he blessed them, he was parted from them, and carried up into heaven.
    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act II, scene viii]:
      The narrow seas that part / The French and English.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter I, in The Purchase Price: Or The Cause of Compromise, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 639762314 ↗, page 0124 ↗:
      "A fine man, that Dunwody, yonder," commented the young captain, as they parted, and as he turned to his prisoner. "We'll see him on in Washington some day. He is strengthening his forces now against Mr. Benton out there. […]."
  8. (obsolete) To hold apart; to stand or intervene between.
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, “The Life and Death of King Iohn”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act V, scene v]:
      The stumbling night did part our weary powers.
  9. To separate by a process of extraction, elimination, or secretion.
    to part gold from silver
    • The liver minds his own affair, […] / And parts and strains the vital juices.
  10. (transitive, archaic) To leave; to quit.
    • 1595 December 9 (first known performance)​, William Shakespeare, “The life and death of King Richard the Second”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358 ↗, [Act III, scene i]:
      since presently your souls must part your bodies
  11. (transitive, internet) To leave (an IRC channel).
    • 2000, "Phantom", Re: Uhm... hi... I guess... (on newsgroup alt.support.boy-lovers)
      He parted the channel saying "SHUTUP!" […] so I queried him, asking if there was something I could do […] maybe talk […] so we did […] since then, I've been seeing him on IRC every day (really can't imagine him not being on IRC anymore actually).
Translations Translations Translations Translations Translations
Adjective

part (not comparable)

  1. Fractional; partial.
    Fred was part owner of the car.

Adverb

part (not comparable)

  1. Partly; partially; fractionally.
    Part finished



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