hatch
Pronunciation Noun

hatch (plural hatches)

  1. A horizontal door in a floor or ceiling.
  2. A trapdoor.
  3. An opening in a wall at window height for the purpose of serving food or other items. A pass through.
    The cook passed the dishes through the serving hatch.
  4. A small door in large mechanical structures and vehicles such as aircraft and spacecraft often provided for access for maintenance.
  5. An opening through the deck of a ship or submarine.
  6. (slang) A gullet.
  7. A frame or weir in a river, for catching fish.
  8. A floodgate; a sluice gate.
  9. (Scotland) A bedstead.
  10. (mining) An opening into, or in search of, a mine.
Translations Translations Translations Translations
  • French: écoutille
  • Italian: osteriggio
  • Russian: шлюз
Verb

hatch (hatches, present participle hatching; past and past participle hatched)

  1. (transitive) To close with a hatch or hatches.
    • RQ
Verb

hatch (hatches, present participle hatching; past and past participle hatched)

  1. (intransitive) (of young animals) To emerge from an egg.
  2. (intransitive) (of eggs) To break open when a young animal emerges from it.
  3. (transitive) To incubate eggs; to cause to hatch.
  4. (transitive) To devise.
Translations Translations Translations Translations Noun

hatch (plural hatches)

  1. The act of hatching.
  2. Development; disclosure; discovery.
    • O'er which his melancholy sits on brood;
      I do doubt the hatch and the disclose
      Will be some danger:
  3. (poultry) A group of birds that emerged from eggs at a specified time.
    These pullets are from an April hatch.
  4. (often as mayfly hatch) The phenomenon, lasting 1–2 days, of large clouds of mayflies appearing in one location to mate, having reached maturity.
    • ante 1947 Edward R. Hewitt, quoted in 1947, Charles K. Fox, Redistribution of the Green Drake, 1997, Norm Shires, Jim Gilford (editors), Limestone Legends, page 104 ↗,
      The Willowemoc above Livington Manor had the largest mayfly hatch I ever knew about fifty years ago.
  5. (informal) A birth, the birth records (in the newspaper) — compare the phrase "hatched, matched, and dispatched."
Translations Verb

hatch (hatches, present participle hatching; past and past participle hatched)

  1. (transitive) To shade an area of (a drawing, diagram, etc.) with fine parallel lines, or with lines which cross each other (cross-hatch).
    • 1695, John Dryden (translator), Observations on the Art of Painting by Charles Alphonse du Fresnoy, London: W. Rogers, p. 201,https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/007657188 ↗
      Those hatching strokes of the pencil.
    • Shall win this sword, silvered and hatched.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To cross; to spot; to stain; to steep.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Francis Beaumont; John Fletcher, “The Humorous Lieutenant”, in Comedies and Tragedies […], London: Printed for Humphrey Robinson, […], and for Humphrey Moseley […], published 1647, OCLC 3083972 ↗, Act 1, scene 1:
      His weapon hatch'd in blood.

Hatch
Proper noun
  1. Surname



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